Friday cyber surfing: Another Skittles-munching back

Good morning. Here’s what’s “out there” about the Seahawks for today, May 4:

Brady Henderson at mynorthwest.com passes along highlights from Robert Turbin’s interview with “Bob and Groz” on 710 ESPN, and the running back from Utah State who was drafted last weekend by the Seahawks has more in common with Marshawn Lynch than their position: “The Seahawks saw Robert Turbin as a big-bodied thumper who could duplicate Marshawn Lynch’s physical running style. That’s not the only thing the newest Seahawks running back has in common with the guy he’ll likely be backing up. Both have Bay Area roots and share an affinity for Skittles. ‘That’s my favorite candy,’ Turbin said when he joined “Bob and Groz” earlier this week.”

Mike Sando at ESPN.com fields “one big question” from a reader about the Seahawks’ QB situation, and whether Matt Flynn will live up to hype he generated from two starts with the Packers: “What we’ve seen from Flynn, the presumed starter even though he hasn’t yet won the job, suggests he’ll be more aggressive than 2011 starter Tarvaris Jackson. He’ll take more chances. That seemed to be his nature with Green Bay. Some of that could reflect the advanced state of the Packers’ offense overall and the types of games Flynn participated in while completing 55 of 81 passes for 731 yards with nine touchdowns and two interceptions in two starts. That is obviously an unsustainable pace; he’s not going to pass for 72 touchdowns with 16 interceptions over a full season. Things will even out if Flynn plays as aggressively as he played while posting that 9-2 ratio.”

Charlie Casserly at NFL.com takes a look at some lingering questions from the NFL Draft, including a few about Seahawks first-round draft choice Bruce Irvin: “Irvin was mentioned to me by many teams as the best pass rusher in the draft. Yet even with that statement most teams placed him in the second round or took him off the board because of off-field concerns. The Seahawks had their pick of all the pass rushers and took him. Irvin was most effective at West Virginia as an outside pass rusher. He was the most explosive defensive end in the draft. But I thought that if he could not beat the offensive tackle off the ball, he had trouble beating his man because of his size and lack of counter moves. I did not think he played the run well. He got engulfed by the offensive linemen blocking him. He does have the potential to be effective rushing the passer, especially at home in Seattle because of the incredible crowd noise that is there.” And his questions are … 1. How many pressures/sacks will he have at home versus on the road?; 2. Will he develop counter moves on his pass rush?; 3. How effective will he be versus the run?

Here at Seahawks.com, we discussed the team’s unique-looking defense with veteran linebacker Leroy Hill and the roots of its uniqueness with coach Pete Carroll: “Leroy Hill admits to the occasional double take as he stepped into the Seahawks’ defensive huddle last season. And who can blame the veteran linebacker, just look at what was surrounding him – and continues to encircle him as the team moves into Phase 2 of its offseason program: a 254-pounder who plays fast and furious at one end (Chris Clemons) and a 332-pounder who plays big and bold at the other end (Red Bryant); a similar smaller/speedier (Earl Thomas) and bigger/brasher (Kam Chancellor) tandem at safety; and 12½ feet of seemingly all arms and legs at the cornerback spots (Brandon Browner and Richard Sherman). Each of these guys is a square peg in the round-hole expectations for the prototypical players who should line up at their positions. But each also played an important role in the Seahawks’ defense ranking ninth in the league last season – Clemons with his 11 sacks; Bryant with his two interceptions as well as his immovable-object presence against the run; Thomas, Chancellor and Browner with their overall games that landed each in the Pro Bowl; and Sherman, the third option on the left side, with his four interceptions and 17 passes defensed. ‘It’s an odd-looking defense when you look at the bodies that we have out there,’ Hill, who is in his eighth season with the team, said Thursday. ‘It’s definitely odd compared to what I’m used to.‘ There is a definite method to the perceived madness of how the Seahawks play defense, and who they use to play it with: Pete Carroll.”

Kick returner/running back Leon Washington attended Sounders FC’s big win over the Galaxy on Wednesday night, and Tony Ventrella caught up with him for this video report.


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