On this date: Dave Brown among players selected in veteran allocation draft

Dave Brown

A look at a memorable moment in Seahawks history that occurred on March 30:

1976: The expansion Seahawks select 39 players in the veteran allocation draft, a group that includes eventual Pro Bowl cornerback Dave Brown and seven others who would be starters for multiple seasons – tackles Norm Evans and Nick Bebout; center Art Kuehn; wide receiver Sam McCullum; tight end Ron Howard; linebacker Ken Geddes; and defensive back Eddie McMillen.


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On this date: McCullum’s catches catapult Seahawks

A look at some memorable moments in Seahawks history that occurred on Dec. 16:

Sam McCullum

1979: Sam McCullum catches eight passes for 173 yards, including a 65-yard touchdown pass from Jim Zorn, in a 29-24 victory over the Raiders in Oakland that caps the Seahawks’ second consecutive winning season (9-7).

1990: The Seahawks lose for the only time in their final six games, 24-17 to the Dolphins in Miami, as Dan Marino passes for two touchdowns and the Dolphins intercept Dave Krieg three times.

2000: Jon Kitna throws a 9-yard touchdown pass to rookie Darrell Jackson with 28 seconds to play, giving the Seahawks a 27-24 victory over the Raiders in a Saturday game at Husky Stadium. Ricky Watters runs for 168 yards and the defense picks off three Rich Gannon passes.

2001: Ricky Watters runs for 104 yards and a touchdown and Ike Charlton returns an interception 38 yards for a score in a 29-3 victory over the Cowboys at Husky Stadium.

2007: In his first NFL start, Matt Moore completes 19 of 27 passes for 208 yards in leading the Panthers to a 13-10 victory over the Seahawks in Carolina. Bobby Engram and Deion Branch combine to catch 17 passes for 169 yards, but the Seahawks’ only TD comes on Matt Hasselbeck’s 15-yard pass to Branch with 1 second left in the game.


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On this date: Done in by Bradshaw

A look at some memorable moments in Seahawks history that occurred on Dec. 4:

Terry Bradshaw

Terry Bradshaw (AP Photo/NFL Photos)

1977: Jim Zorn throws touchdown passes to Sam McCullum (65 yards) and Steve Largent (30), but Terry Bradshaw runs for two scores and throws for a third in the Steelers’ 30-20 victory in Pittsburgh.

1983: Tony Dorsett runs for 117 yards and two touchdowns for the Cowboys, while Dave Krieg is sacked eight times and throws two interceptions in a 35-10 loss in Dallas.

1988: Robert Perryman scores on a 1-yard run midway through the third quarter, giving the Patriots a 13-7 victory over the Seahawks in New England. The Seahawks gain only 65 total yards, while Eugene Robinson (17 tackles), Darren Comeaux (11), Dave Wyman (10) and Jeff Bryant (10) pace the defensive effort.

1989: Dave Krieg passes 51 yards to John L. Williams for a fourth quarter touchdown as the Seahawks pull out a 17-16 victory over the Bills at the Kingdome on “Monday Night Football.”


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On this date: Mr. Lynch comes to Washington

A look at the memorable moments in Seahawks history that occurred on Oct. 5:

1980: Sam McCullum catches two touchdown passes and Efren Herrera kicks four field goals in a 26-7 victory over the Oilers in the Astrodome, in what will be the Seahawks’ last win of the season.

1997: Steve Broussard breaks touchdown runs of 77 and 43 yards, and gains 138 yards on just six carries, as the Seahawks start a three-game winning streak with a 16-13 victory over the Titans at the Kingdome.

2003: Josh Brown kicks a club-record 58-yard field goal in Green Bay, but the Seahawks lose to the Packers 35-13.

2010: Running back Marshawn Lynch is acquired in a trade with the Bills. Lynch leads the team in rushing that season and turns in one of the most electrifying plays in franchise history when he scores on a 67-yard run in the wild-card playoff win over the defending Super Bowl champion Saints.


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On this date: Zorn rallies, but ‘Hawks fall to Cardinals in franchise’s first game

A look at a memorable moment in Seahawks history that occurred on Sept. 12:

Jim Zorn, the team’s starting quarterback during the club’s inaugural season, was named NFC Offensive Rookie of the Year in 1976, as he led the NFL in attempts with 439 and set a then-record 2,571 passing yards, which was also a record for an expansion team.

1976 – The expansion Seahawks play their first regular-season game, losing to the St. Louis Cardinals 30-24 at the Kingdome. The Cardinals take a 30-10 lead before Jim Zorn rallies the Seahawks in the fourth quarter with a 72-yard touchdown pass to Sam McCullum and an 8-yard TD run. Zorn passes for 292 yards and two touchdowns – both to McCullum, who catches four passes for 112 yards.


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On this date

A look at the memorable – and not-so-memorable – moments in Seahawks history that occurred on Dec. 16:

1979: Sam McCullum catches eight passes for 173 yards, including a 65-yard touchdown pass from Jim Zorn, in a 29-24 victory over the Raiders in Oakland that caps the Seahawks’ second consecutive winning season (9-7).

1990: The Seahawks lose for the only time in their final six games, 24-17 to the Dolphins in Miami, as Dan Marino passes for two touchdowns and the Dolphins intercept Dave Krieg three times.

2000: Jon Kitna throws a 9-yard touchdown pass to Darrell Jackson with 28 seconds to play, giving the Seahawks a 27-24 victory over the Raiders in a Saturday game at Husky Stadium. Ricky Watters runs for 168 yards and the defense picks off three Rich Gannon passes.

2001: Ricky Watters runs for 104 yards and a touchdown and Ike Charlton returns an interception 38 yards for a score in a 29-3 victory over the Cowboys at Husky Stadium.

2007: In his first NFL start, Matt Moore completes 19 of 27 passes for 208 yards in leading the Panthers to a 13-10 victory over the Seahawks in Carolina. Bobby Engram and Deion Branch combine to catch 17 passes for 169 yards, but the Seahawks’ only TD comes on Matt Hasselbeck’s 15-yard pass to Branch with 1 second left in the game.


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On this date

A look at the memorable moments in Seahawks history that occurred on Dec. 4:

1977: Jim Zorn throws touchdown passes to Sam McCullum (65 yards) and Steve Largent (30), but Terry Bradshaw runs for two scores and throws for a third in the Steelers’ 30-20 victory in Pittsburgh.

1983: Tony Dorsett runs for 117 yards and two touchdowns for the Cowboys, while Dave Krieg is sacked eight times and throws two interceptions in a 35-10 loss in Dallas.

1988: Robert Perryman scores on a 1-yard run midway through the third quarter, giving the Patriots a 13-7 victory over the Seahawks in New England. The Seahawks gain only 65 total yards, while Eugene Robinson (17 tackles), Darren Comeaux (11), Dave Wyman (10) and Jeff Bryant (10) pace the defensive effort.

1989: Dave Krieg passes 51 yards to John L. Williams for a fourth quarter touchdown as the Seahawks pull out a 17-16 victory over the Bills at the Kingdome on “Monday Night Football.”


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On this date

A look at the memorable moments in Seahawks history that occurred on Oct. 5:

1980: Sam McCullum catches two touchdown passes and Efren Herrera kicks four field goals in a 26-7 victory over the Oilers in the Astrodome, in what would be the Seahawks’ last win of the season.

1997: Steve Broussard breaks touchdown runs of 77 and 43 yards, and gains 138 yards on just six carries, as the Seahawks start a three-game winning streak with a 16-13 victory over the Titans at the Kingdome.

2003: Josh Brown kicks a club-record 58-yard field goal in Green Bay, but the Seahawks lose to the Packers 35-13.

2010: Running back Marshawn Lynch is acquired in a trade with the Bills. Lynch leads the team in rushing and turns in one of the most electrifying plays in franchise history when he scores on a 67-yard run in the wild-card playoff win over the defending Super Bowl champion Saints.


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Cyber surfing: Sunday

Good morning. Here’s what’s “out there” about the Seahawks for today, Sept. 11:

Steve Kelley of the Seattle Times “eavesdrops” on Pete Carroll’s pregame talk to his players at Candlestick Park before today’s regular-season opener against the 49ers. Offers Kelley: “Moments before the Seahawks take the field for Sunday’s season opener against the San Francisco 49ers, coach Pete Carroll gathers his players in the cramped, Spartan locker room underneath Candlestick Park and lights their fuses for the fight ahead. Talking in one long, run-on sentence, he sounds like the pitchman at a carnival. His words come in oral blasts that have the force of a water cannon. As he begins, Carroll flashes back to some of the road games from last season and the anger starts to build. You can almost hear him above the roar of the jet engines in Burlingame.”

Also at the Times, Danny O’Neil looks at Carroll’s 4-1 record in previous openers as a head coach in the NFL.  Offers O’Neil: “But Carroll has a history that’s relevant here. After years at USC, he’s accustomed to incorporating new staff members and dealing with roster turnover, which he estimated at 30 percent a year. He’s also got a track record that shows he’s ready more often than not when the season begins. He is 4-1 in season openers as an NFL head coach, the lone loss coming with the Patriots in 1998. He was 9-0 in season openers at USC. Sure, there were a couple cupcakes, but the Trojans also opened with Virginia Tech, Arkansas and Auburn (twice) under Carroll.”

Dave Boling at the News Tribune runs through the indicators for this opener, with an eye to last season’s misleading results against the 49ers in Seattle. Says Boling: “After last season’s experience, we might want to add a key factor for fans watching this one: Remember, it’s only the first game, and a lot can happen in either direction in the 15 games that follow.”

John Boyle at the Everett Herald looks at the collaboration between Carroll and GM John Schneider that has produced the team that will take the field today. Says Boyle: “Yet 1½ years after Schneider was hired, all signs point to (Tod) Leiweke’s “fantastic collaboration” being a very real thing. And if the 2011 season, which kicks off in San Francisco today, turns out to be a success, Carroll believes his relationship with Schneider will be the biggest part of it. ‘By far the best advantage I have is John,’ Carroll said. ‘Making the transition, putting it all together, he’s been phenomenal. We get along great and have a ball doing what we’re doing.’ “

Also at the Herald, Scott Johnson continues his “The Game of My Life” series with former wide receiver Sam McCullum. Says Johnson: “The greatest game of Sam McCullum’s six-year career in Seattle wasn’t a memorable, come-from-behind victory that changed the course of a season. In fact, it wasn’t even a victory. And to call it memorable would actually be misleading because McCullum doesn’t remember a thing that happened after halftime. After suffering a concussion at the hands of a man that many consider the hardest hitter in NFL history, McCullum blacked out but still set a franchise record for receiving yards in the game.”

Christian Caple at PI.com has five things to watch in today’s game. No. 1 on the list? The newest look for the Seahawks’ new-look offensive line. Says Caple: “Want to hear something a tad unsettling? Seahawks center Max Unger, he of 17 career NFL starts, will be the most experienced player on the team’s starting offensive line Sunday.”

Here at Seahawks.com, we’ve got a look at the team Carroll and Schneider have compiled. “The question now: How long will it take this mix to mesh? ‘We don’t know. Nobody knows right now,’ a candid Carroll admitted after Friday’s final practice to prepare for Sunday’s opener. ‘You’ve got to find out what happens when you start playing the games. It’s going to be interesting to watch our team as we grow together. We’re going to have to learn. We don’t know everything about them yet, but we’ll learn as we go.’ ”

There’s also Tony Ventrella’s video preview of the game, as well as a look at the other meaning in today’s game.


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The NFL World, According to Dave Brown

Dave Brown did not become a coach with the Seahawks until 1992. But the Pro Bowl cornerback actually began coaching his teammates during his 10-year playing career.

Just ask Paul Johns, who made the team as rookie free agent wide receiver/punt returner in 1981 and now is the team’s assistant director of community outreach. Johns caught 34 passes and scored four touchdowns in 1983, when he also was the team’s leading receiver in the playoffs (11 for 168 yards). He returned a punt 75 yards for a TD that season, as well, and his 11.4-yard average on 74 returns still ranks No. 2 in franchise history.

“Dave Brown was the one who made me realize that this was a different game up here in the NFL, and you’d better study,” said Johns, who lists Brown, Hall of Fame wide receiver Steve Largent and fellow wide-out Sam McCullum as “the three guys who taught me the most” in a career that ended during the 1984 season because of a neck injury.

“Dave taught me about coming out of your breaks quickly, because Dave would run your route better than you would. If you brought a college route, trying to bring it to the pros, Dave would run your route better. Because he had studied the way the route was supposed to be run, and how other receivers in the league would run it. So he taught be how to be precise in running my routes.”

Your teammates tend to listen when you’re on the way to becoming the franchise’s all-time leader in interceptions (50) and interception returns for touchdowns (five), and also ranking seventh in tackles (684) and sixth in games started (159). Brown’s final season with the Seahawks was 1986. He returned to coach the defensive backs from 1992-98. Brown died after suffering a heart attack in 2006, but his legacy – and lessons taught – obviously live on.

“The other thing Dave taught me was, ‘Be in a hurry, but don’t rush,’ ” Johns said. “I always kept that in my head: Be in a hurry, but don’t rush.

“Be in a hurry to get into your route, but don’t cut it short. Be in a hurry to come out of your break, but don’t rush it. Because everything in the NFL is timing. So that was my mantra: Be in a hurry, but don’t rush.”

If Johns ever needed a role model on his side of the ball, there was Largent.

“He was in a hurry, but nothing was rushed,” Johns said. “It all came together when I’d watch Steve: Be in a hurry, but don’t rush.”

From Dave Brown’s lips, to Steve Largent’s routes, to Paul Johns’ NFL education.


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