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On this date: Cortez Kennedy elected to Pro Football Hall of Fame

Cortez Kennedy

A look at some memorable moments in Seahawks history that occurred on Feb. 4:

1990: Dave Krieg completes 15 of 23 passes for 148 yards and a touchdown, but the NFC wins the Pro Bowl 27-21. Jerry Gray, a cornerback for the Rams who would go on to coach the Seahawks’ defensive backs in 2010, is named MVP after returning an interception 51 yards for a TD and also registering seven tackles. Rufus Porter (two tackles) and Brian Blades (one reception) also represent the Seahawks in the game.

1996: Chris Warren leads the NFC with 43 rushing yards, but the NFC wins the Pro Bowl 20-13.

1998: Jim Johnson is named linebackers coach on Dennis Erickson’s staff. Johnson remains for only one season before becoming the Eagles’ defensive coordinator, but his impact on the Seahawks’ defense is apparent even after he leaves.

2010: First-year coach Pete Carroll announces his staff: Jeremy Bates (offensive coordinator), Gus Bradley (defensive coordinator), Brian Schneider (special teams coordinator), Kippy Brown (wide receivers), Luke Butkus (quality control/offensive line), Dave Canales (quality control/offense), Chris Carlisle (head strength and conditioning), Jedd Fisch (quarterbacks), Mondray Gee (assistant strength and conditioning), Alex Gibbs (offensive line), Jerry Gray (defensive backs), Kris Richard (assistant defensive backs), Rocky Seto (quality control/defense), Sherman Smith (running backs), Jeff Ulbrich (assistant special teams), Art Valero (assistant offensive line) and Jamie Yancher (assistant strength and conditioning).

2012: Cortez Kennedy, in his seventh year of eligibility and fourth year as a finalist, is elected to the Pro Football Hall of Fame. An eight-time Pro Bowl selection and member of the NFL Team of the Decade for the 1990s as a defensive tackle, Kennedy joins Steve Largent as the only career-long Seahawks player in the Hall.


On this date: Steve Largent ties Pro Bowl record with five catches

Steve Largent

A look at some memorable moments in Seahawks history that occurred on Jan. 29:

1979: Steve Largent, the Seahawks’ first representative to the Pro Bowl, ties a then-record by catching five passes but the NFC wins the game 13-7 at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum.

1984: Chuck Knox coaches the AFC Pro Bowl team after the Seahawks lose the AFC Championship Game to the Raiders, and has Kenny Easley and Curt Warner on the squad. But the NFC wins 45-3. Rams safety Nolan Cromwell, who would later coach the Seahawks wide receivers, returns an interception 44 yards for a touchdown.

1989: Dave Krieg is 3 of 14 for 21 yards and the AFC manages only a field goal in a 34-3 loss in the Pro Bowl. Rufus Porter also was on the AFC squad.


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On this date: Tez rambles for six

A look at some memorable moments in Seahawks history that occurred on Dec. 13:

Cortez Kennedy

1980: The Chargers take a 21-0 halftime lead and hold on for a 21-14 victory in San Diego, as Jim Jodat and Steve Largent score second-half touchdowns.

1981: Kenny Easley and John Harris intercept passes and Dave Krieg throws a touchdown pass to David Hughes, but it’s not enough in a 23-13 loss to the Broncos at Mile High Stadium.

1987: Dave Krieg throws three touchdown passes, including two to Ray Butler, and the defense sacks John Elway four times and intercepts him twice in a 28-21 victory over the Broncos at the Kingdome.

1992: Hershel Walker scores a touchdown with less than five minutes to play in regulation to tie the score and Roger Ruzek kicks a 44-yard field goal in overtime to give the Eagles a 20-17 victory over the Seahawks at the Kingdome. The defense sacks Randall Cunningham 10 times, including 2½ by Rufus Porter and Robert Blackmon and two by Cortez Kennedy, but the offense generates only 87 total yards.

1998: Cortez Kennedy returns a fumble 39 yards for a touchdown and the defense also intercepts a club-record seven passes in a 38-17 victory over the Chargers. Jay Bellamy, Darryl Williams and Shawn Springs each have two picks, and Terry McDaniel returns his 43 yards for a touchdown. Jon Kitna passes for one touchdown and runs for another.

2009: Andre Johnson catches 10 passes for 184 yards and two touchdowns – in the first half – as the Titans hand the Seahawks a 34-7 loss in Houston.


On this date: Krieg-to-Turner ignites big day, and win

A look at some memorable moments in Seahawks history that occurred on Nov. 25:

Dave Krieg

Dave Krieg (AP Photo/NFL Photos)

1984: Dave Krieg passes for 406 yards and three touchdowns, including an 80-yarder to Daryl Turner on the first play of the game, in a 27-24 victory over the Broncos at Mile High Stadium. Steve Largent catches 12 passes for 191 yards and a TD as the Seahawks win their seventh consecutive game.

1990: Norm Johnson kicks a 40-yard field goal 3:01 into overtime in a 13-10 victory over the Chargers in San Diego. The defense does its part, as Patrick Hunter forces a fumble that is recovered by Jacob Green with 48 seconds left in regulation; and Nesby Glasgow forces a fumble that is recovered by Rufus Porter at the Chargers’ 23-yard line 1:34 into overtime to setup Johnson’s game-winner.

2007: Leonard Weaver scores on a 5-yard run with less than six minutes to play in 24-19 victory over the Rams in St. Louis, as the Seahawks score the final 17 points in the game. Their only points in the first half come on Josh Wilson’s 89-yard kickoff return for a touchdown.


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On this date: 64 first downs, and one Seahawks win

A look at some memorable moments in Seahawks history that occurred on Nov. 24:

Matt Hasselbeck

Matt Hasselbeck (AP Photo/John Froschauer)

1991: The defense holds the Broncos on downs twice in Seahawks territory in the final 4:49 of a 13-10 victory at the Kingdome. Rufus Porter leads the effort with three of the team’s five sacks and the Seahawks also force four turnovers.

2002: The teams combine for an NFL-record 64 first downs as the Seahawks beat the Chiefs 39-32 in Seattle. Shaun Alexander runs for 145 yards and two touchdowns, Matt Hasselbeck passes for 362 yards and three touchdowns and Koren Robinson catches eight passes for 168 yards and TD to offset a 307-combined yards, three-TD performance by the Chiefs’ Priest Holmes.


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On this date: Alexander runs wild

A look at some memorable moments in Seahawks history that occurred on Sept. 29:

1991 – Chris Warren scores on a 59-yard punt return – the first by a Seahawk since 1986 – and QB Dan McGwire makes his first NFL start in a 31-3 victory over the Colts at the Kingdome. The Seahawks also rush for 168 yards, as Derrick Fenner and John L. Williams each run a TD. McGwire is replaced in the second half by Jeff Kemp, who throws a TD pass to Tommy Kane. Cortez Kennedy and Rufus Porter collect two sacks each to pace the defensive effort.

2002 – Shaun Alexander sets an NFL record by scoring five times in the first half of a 48-23 win over the Vikings at Seahawks Stadium. Alexander scores on an 80-yard screen pass as well as runs of 2, 20, 3 and 14 yards. Reggie Tongue also returns an interception 46 yards for a TD, as the Seahawks score four times in a 1-minute, 47-second blur at the end of the first half.

(AP Photo/Jim Bryant)


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Thursday cyber surfing: Wilson a ‘star in the making’

Good morning. Here’s what’s “out there” about the Seahawks for today, June 28:

Mike Sando at ESPN.com passes along an interesting – and possibly insightful – comment on rookie QB Russell Wilson from Tony Softli, a former personnel evaluator for the Panthers and Rams: “(Matt) Flynn will have his hands full in a training camp competition against this star in the making.” The item also includes this pre-draft assessment from Football Outsiders of the player who ended up being the Seahawks’ third-round choice: “Considering the examples from Wilson’s junior year in the Atlantic Coast Conference where he’s effective on deep passes off play-action, throws receivers open, and improvises on the move, his potential to develop into an NFL quarterback is better than his height may indicate,” (Matt) Waldman wrote. “Still, it is reasonable to approach Wilson’s NFL prospects with skepticism. (Drew) Brees never overcame doubts from the organization that drafted him. … However, as Brees, Tom Brady, Marc Bulger, Matt Hasselbeck, Tony Romo and Kurt Warner, and several others have demonstrated, careers don’t end due to an inauspicious beginning.”

Sando also offers his thoughts on KC Joyner’s thought that cornerback Brandon Browner is among the most overrated players in the league: “Joyner pointed to the Seahawks cornerback’s league-high penalty count (19) as one indicator. He also used various coverage metrics to suggest Browner wasn’t all that good in coverage, either. I might have considered Browner’s teammate, Richard Sherman, as a superior choice to represent the NFC at season’s end. Pro Bowl voting was completed before then, of course. While Browner did commit too many penalties, those flags represented something positive, as well. Browner continually harassed opposing receivers near the line of scrimmage. Overrated or not, he was a pain to play against.” I’ll second that, and also point out that Browner led the NFL with 23 passes defensed.

And still more from Sando, he offers his “hidden treasure” for the NFC West teams and tabs the wide receivers for the Seahawks: “The Seahawks haven’t sent a player to the Pro Bowl as a full-time wide receiver since Brian Blades made it following the 1989 season. That streak appears unlikely to end anytime soon. The team invested virtually nothing in the position this offseason. A few questions persist – for example, what does Mike Williams have in store? – but with so much attention on quarterbacks and the Seattle defense, wide receiver gets my vote as a Seahawks position group that could surprise.” The Seahawks have had only two wide-outs voted to the Pro Bowl in franchise history – Steve Largent (seven times) and Blades (once).

Danny O’Neil at the Seattle Times looks at rookie offensive linemen J.R. Sweezy and Rishaw Johnson: “… There are going to be the rookies to consider, and yes, that’s going to be rookies with an ‘s’ to indicate plural. The Seahawks chose J.R. Sweezy from North Carolina State in the seventh round, and have converted him from defensive tackle into an offensive guard. When the rookie minicamp ended in early May, coach Pete Carroll gave a very positive review. … The other rookie who made a strong first impression was Rishaw Johnson, an undrafted free agent signed from California (Pa.) University, which is the same college where the Seahawks found quarterback Josh Portis a year ago.”

With school out for the summer, Pat Kirwan at CBSSports.com offers a final examine to test your retention of what happened during the 2011 NFL season: “Think you remember how it all happened? Want to test your memory and maybe learn a thing or two? Have some fun taking this 21-question, multiple-choice (guess?) quiz.”

Here at Seahawks.com, we take a look at the last of the team’s offseason workouts – and the nine rookie free agents who concluded the program this week: “Rookie free agents do face the longest of odds, as (strength and conditioning coach Chris) Carlisle said, in their attempts to earn spots on the 53-man roster or practice squad. But the Seahawks always have been good to undrafted rookies, and vice versa. The team’s honor roll of longest-odds beaters includes Ring of Honor quarterback Dave Krieg; free safety Eugene Robinson, the franchise’s all-time leading tackler; nose tackle Joe Nash, special teamer/linebacker Rufus Porter and fullback Mack Strong, who all played in the Pro Bowl during their careers and, like Robinson, were voted to the Seahawks’ 35th Anniversary team; and Doug Baldwin, the team’s leading receiver last season. ‘There are a lot of guys who came in as free-agent rookies who play in the Pro Bowl, who were Super Bowl champions, that are in Canton (at the Pro Football Hall of Fame) right now that have gone from didn’t-have-a-chance to being pretty darn special,’ Carlisle said. Carlisle’s history lesson did not fall on deaf ears. ‘This is a program that kind of breeds these undrafted free agents, and that fact is very encouraging,’ said (tight end Sean) McGrath, who was heading back to Henderson State University in Arkansas to pack up the last of his left-behind belongings before going home to the Chicago area. ‘Anything can happen. You’ve just got to put your mind to it and keep working hard.’ ”


Thursday cyber surfing: And still more on Irvin

Good morning. Here’s what’s “out there” about the Seahawks for today, May 3:

Just when you thought there was nothing left to say about Bruce Irvin, former Seahawks linebacker turned 710 ESPN analyst Dave Wyman says a lot: “His speed off the edge allows him to simply run past and around offensive tackles and tight ends. Irvin said Saturday that he feels he can run forward much faster than any lineman can “kick step” backwards. He did plenty of times at West Virginia, registering 22.5 sacks over the past two seasons. Most importantly, he has the ability to do something that I haven’t seen here in Seattle since my old teammate Rufus Porter used to do it. Irvin can turn a corner at full speed. He leans his body so his shoulders are about three feet off the ground and doesn’t slow down. This leads me to believe that he understands angles, he understands that he must fight for every last inch of space in order to “get home,” and he never slows down to do it.”

Here at Seahawks.com we check in with Michael Robinson, who is altering his approach to this offseason after his first season as a fulltime lead-blocking fullback that ended with him and Marshawn Lynch playing in the Pro Bowl: “Robinson’s mindset this offseason has been to prepare himself so that he can pick up in 2012 where he left off in 2011. That started with hitting the weights earlier than usual, monitoring his caloric intake and also adding to and increasing his regiment of recovery techniques. ‘I usually would take about a month off after the season, completely,’ he said. ‘This year, I took two weeks off. I adjusted my diet a little bit to make sure I was getting the calories in me every day so I can prepare to do the workouts. Now I’m to the point where I’m doing two workouts a day. Already.’ That comes with the position, and being one of the smaller players in the league to play the position. In his matchups with Pro Bowl tacklers last season, Robinson gave up 17 pounds to Willis, 22 to Fletcher, 27 to Lewis and 35 to Urlacher. But Lynch had three of his six 100-yard rushing performances in those games, and in the Week 16 game against San Francisco he broke the 49ers’ 36-game streak of not allowing a 100-yard rusher and also was the first to score a rushing TD against them last season. ‘I always have to fill the weight on me, or it will go away (during the season),’ said Robinson, who is up to 239 pounds. ‘That’s one of the things I really had to adjust to – lifting heavy, on a consistent basis. I’m stronger than I was at this time last year. Hopefully it will pay dividends for me in the fall.’ ”

Wednesday was a sad day in the NFL for anyone who ever played with, coached, played against or just watched Junior Seau, who was found dead in his Oceanside, Calif., home. Tributes and reports are everywhere, but one of the best comes from Jim Trotter at SI.com, who covered the Chargers during Seau’s Pro Bowl-filled run in San Diego: “You have to understand: Junior Seau didn’t live in San Diego. He was San Diego. Largely because he never forgot where he came from. He grew up hard in Oceanside, fighting for food and sometimes sleeping on mattresses in the garage. It’s one reason he focused on young people and struggling families when he established his foundation in the early 1990s. For instance, each Thanksgiving he would shut down the Mission Valley restaurant bearing his name and feed families affected by domestic violence and military personnel away from home. During Christmas, the foundation partners with a local store to allow underprivileged kids an opportunity to “purchase” gifts for family members. In total the Junior Seau Foundation, which also helps young people attend college, has distributed nearly $4 million since its inception. When Seau retired for the first time, we sat in the cool air outside his restaurant and reflected on his career. When I told him that his legacy off the field would ultimately dwarf what he did on it, he stared at me and said nothing. I walked away wondering if he truly understood how many lives he had touched with his generosity. He still seemed to measure his happiness (self worth?) by how people viewed him as a player. And now I wonder if that career didn’t contribute to his passing.”


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On this date: Carroll compiles staff

A look at the memorable moments in Seahawks history that occurred on Feb. 4:

1990: Dave Krieg completes 15 of 23 passes for 148 yards and a touchdown, but the NFC wins the Pro Bowl 27-21. Jerry Gray, a cornerback for the Rams who would go on to coach the Seahawks’ defensive backs in 2010, is named MVP after returning an interception 51 yards for a TD and also registering seven tackles. Rufus Porter (two tackles) and Brian Blades (one reception) also represent the Seahawks in the game.

1996: Chris Warren leads the NFC with 43 rushing yards, but the NFC wins the Pro Bowl 20-13.

1998: Jim Johnson is named linebackers coach on Dennis Erickson’s staff. Johnson remains for only one season before becoming the Eagles’ defensive coordinator, but his impact on the Seahawks’ defense is apparent even after he leaves.

2010: First-year coach Pete Carroll announces his staff: Jeremy Bates (offensive coordinator), Gus Bradley (defensive coordinator), Brian Schneider (special teams coordinator), Kippy Brown (wide receivers), Luke Butkus (quality control/offensive line), Dave Canales (quality control/offense), Chris Carlisle (head strength and conditioning), Jedd Fisch (quarterbacks), Mondray Gee (assistant strength and conditioning), Alex Gibbs (offensive line), Jerry Gray (defensive backs), Kris Richard (assistant defensive backs), Rocky Seto (quality control/defense), Sherman Smith (running backs), Jeff Ulbrich (assistant special teams), Art Valero (assistant offensive line) and Jamie Yancher (assistant strength and conditioning).


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On this date: Largent ties Pro Bowl record

A look at the memorable moments in Seahawks history that occurred on Jan. 29:

1979: Steve Largent, the Seahawks’ first representative to the Pro Bowl, ties a record by catching five passes but the NFC wins the game 13-7 at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum.

1984: Chuck Knox coaches the AFC Pro Bowl team after the Seahawks lose the AFC Championship Game to the Raiders, and has Kenny Easley and Curt Warner on the squad. But the NFC wins 45-3. Rams safety Nolan Cromwell, who would later coach the Seahawks wide receivers, returns an interception 44 yards for a touchdown.

1989: Dave Krieg is 3 of 14 for 21 yards and the AFC manages only a field goal in a 34-3 loss in the Pro Bowl. Rufus Porter also was on the AFC squad.


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