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Seahawks advance to “Sweet 16″ in bracket to determine Greatest Uniform in NFL History

VOTE | nfl.com/greatestuni

Oh, how sweet it is.

The Seahawks’ current jerseys (a No. 6 seed) have advanced to the round of 16 in Dave Dameshek’s NFL.com bracket to determine the greatest uniform in NFL history. The club’s current digs toppled the current uniforms of the New York Giants (No. 3) in round two by a final vote count of 74,688 to 35,085 – an achievement that came one round after more than doubling up on the No. 11 seed Tampa Bay Buccaneers, 51,937 to 25,689, to open bracket play.

The Seahawks unis are now matched up against the current unis of the New Orleans Saints in what should be a close battle between two fierce fan bases – Seattle’s 12th Man and New Orleans’ “Who Dat” nation. Voting for Round 3 ends on Sunday, July 14 at 6 p.m. PT.

And if you’re playing catch up, the Seahawks’ current jerseys and 1976 throwback digs were featured when Dameshek unveiled the competition early last week, but by way of fan vote only the club’s new jersey made it out of the competition’s first-round.


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Wednesday round-up: 2013 running back, D-line & special teams previews

Brock Huard and Danny O’Neil of 710 AM ESPN Seattle’s “Brock and Danny” discuss the Seahawks’ new additions along the defensive line and look ahead at how the position group projects heading into 2013

Good morning, and here’s what’s “out there” for today, Wednesday, July 10, about your Seattle Seahawks:

In anticipation of NFL.com’s feature set to run later today naming the most overrated and underrated players in Seahawks history, Bob Condotta of the Seattle Times takes his own stab at guessing who might make their list.

Eric Williams of the Tacoma News Tribune says offseason addition Cliff Avril will be counted on to “carry the load” as the team’s top pass rusher.

Danny O’Neil of 710Sports.com continues his positional preview series with a look at the loaded Seahawks backfield, and O’Neil also hosted his latest “Hawk Talk” chat yesterday afternoon, the full transcript of which can be found here.

O’Neil and co-host Brock Huard of 710 AM ESPN Seattle’s “Brock and Danny” caught up with former Seahawks quarterback and current Indianapolis Colts signal caller Matt Hasselbeck, who is currently vacationing in Eastern Washington, in the podcast below:


We also have the podcast from O’Neil and Huard’s Seahawks roundtable discussion with ESPN’s John Clayton and NFC West blogger Mike Sando. The foursome talks about what to expect from the club offensively heading into the new season:


NFL.com Around the League writer Marc Sessler ranks the NFL’s Top 8 deepest backfields, and the Seahawks’ quartet of Marshawn Lynch, Robert Turbin, Christine Michael, and Derrick Coleman comes in at No. 2.

Here at Seahawks.com, Clare Farnsworth wraps up his 2013 positional preview series by highlighting the club’s special teams unit.

In news around the rest of the League, NFL.com columnist Adam Schein labels the New Orleans Saints as 2013′s most-fascinating team – Schein pegged the Seahawks in that same position last year. The Saints and Seahawks square off in Week 13 (Dec. 2) this season on ESPN’s Monday Night Football at CenturyLink Field.

NFL.com Around the League writer Chris Wesseling takes a look at which NFL records could be broken in the season ahead.

In a lighthearted piece at NFL.com, Henry Hodgson – the site’s “exclusive supplemental draft expert” – has his seven-round mock of Thursday’s 2013 supplemental draft.

NFL.com’s NFL Total Access crew ranks the Top 10 greatest touchdown celebrations of all-time in this short video feature.

And for a bit of off-the-field news, club chairman Paul Allen’s album “Everywhere At Once” is set for an August 3 release, but you can preview 13 tracks from Allen and the Underthinkers here.


Thursday cyber surfing: Seahawks hold keys to Seattle’s next sports superstar?

Good morning, here’s what’s “out there” about the Seahawks for today, July 12.

At the Seattle Times, Jerry Brewer tells us Seattle is in dire need of a new sports superstar. Brewer points to years 1990-2010 as a time when Seattle experienced an unforgettable – and remarkable – run of sports superstars: Ken Griffey Jr., Ichiro, Gary Payton, Shawn Kemp, Steve Emtman, Alex Rodriguez, Randy Johnson, Walter Jones, Lou Piniella, George Karl and Mike Holmgren. As Seattle continues to search for it’s new sports identity, Brewer offered that the Seahawks have the potential to shape that mold, “With quality talent evaluators such as Mariners general manager Jack Zduriencik and Seahawks GM John Schneider in town, you can already see the potential for a new generation of superstars. Seahawks safety Earl Thomas has a chance to be, at least, the best safety in the NFL. If [Marshawn] Lynch goes off, there’s a possibility he could be elite. [Felix] Hernandez is just 26, and with some help, it’s easy to see him taking that final step to becoming a superstar. Matt Flynn, who is expected to be the Seahawks’ starting quarterback this season, could become a star, but if rookie Russell Wilson eventually wins the job and performs at a star level, a small, 5-foot-11 quarterback would have a better chance of captivating a national audience.”

Also at the Seattle Times, Danny O’Neil continues to take a close look at the Seahawks wide receiver position, this time turning his attention to fourth-year pro Deon Butler. O’Neil admits that he has questioned whether or not Butler would land on the team’s 53-man rosters the past two seasons, as he notes Butler’s small stature in a system that favors bigger wide receivers, and points to a leg injury that landed Butler on the Physically Unable to Perform (PUP) list to start the 2011 season . In 2012, O’Neil still finds himself questioning Butler’s status among the wide receiver group, but if history is any indication for Butler, O’Neil gives him a good shot at making the squad, “Go ahead, crunch the numbers, but come Sept. 1, I think it would be very hard for Seattle to pick its 53 best players for the roster and not have Butler among that group. That’s not to say it’s impossible. He’s not a special-teams mainstay like veteran Ben Obomanu has been, and he hasn’t shown that uncanny knack as a slot receiver like [Doug] Baldwin did. He doesn’t have the height of [Sidney] Rice, [Kris] Durham or Mike Williams — all of whom stand 6-4 or taller. But Butler is in the conversation for the fastest receiver on the roster, and he has shown a professionalism and ability to bounce back from both adversity and injury. And the past two years have shown that for all the questions of whether he’ll be back, the guy listed as the smallest player on Seattle’s roster has some staying power”

Here at Seahawks.com Clare Farnsworth continues with his 2012 positional breakdown, as he takes a look at the Seahawks linebacking corps heading into the new season. Farnsworth speaks to the group’s healthy mix of youth and experience, “On a team that has been in a constant change since coach Pete Carroll and general manager John Schneider took over 30 months ago, the linebacking crew has undergone one of the most major transformations under [Seahawks linebackers coach Ken] Norton. The last linebacker standing from the team’s glory days of winning the NFC Championship in 2005 is [Leroy] Hill, who continues to be the starter on the weakside. David Hawthorne took over in the middle for Lofa Tatupu in 2010, but with the team’s leading tackler the past three seasons now with the New Orleans Saints, Hawthorne will be replaced by either the youthful enthusiasm of [Bobby] Wagner or the productive experience of [Barrett] Ruud. On the strong side, [K.J.] Wright played so well as a rookie last season that the club traded former first-round draft choice Aaron Curry to the Oakland Raiders. … This seemingly mismatched collection of linebackers creates an interesting blend of skills and talents that should allow Carroll and coordinator Gus Bradley to play the way they want to, and need to – fast, physical, aggressive and smart – in matching the efforts of the Pro Bowl-laced secondary and line.”