Blog Homepage

Blog Home

The Sea Gals

The Sea Gals Homepage


How strong? Mack Strong

Mack Strong

The Browns’ selection of Barkevious Mingo with the sixth pick overall in last month’s NFL Draft has prompted the folks at NFL.com to compile a photo gallery of the NFL’s all-time all-name team.

The fullback is Mack Strong, the former Seahawk whose parents must have known he was destined to block for three 1,000-yard rushers during his 15-season stay in Seattle.

Writes Jim Reineking: “This is the perfect confluence of first name and surname. In 15 seasons with the Seattle Seahawks, Strong was a lead blocker for three different 1,000-yard rushers (Chris Warren, Ricky Watters and Shaun Alexander). His 32-yard touchdown run in a 2005 divisional playoff game was a team record until Marshawn Lynch went on his famous ‘Beast Mode’ run (in a 2010 wild-card game) that set off a seismic event.”

But Strong was more than just a lead blocker. Only Joe Nash (218) has played in more games for the Seahawks than Strong (201) – and both made the team as rookie free agents; Nash in 1982 and Strong in 1993 (he spent his rookie season on the practice squad). No one won the Steve Largent Award more than times than Strong (five). He also was voted to two Pro Bowls, selected All-Pro in 2005 and named to the Seahawks’ 35th Anniversary team.

Also on the all-time all-name team: offensive lineman Floyd “Pork Chop” Womack, who played with the Seahawks from 2001-08; long snapper Trey Junkin, who was with the Seahawks from 1990-95; and safety Atari Bigby, who spent the 2010 season with the Seahawks.

As for Mingo’s first name, at the NFL Scouting Combine he explained it this way: “My mom just kind of threw it together and wrote it on my birth certificate.”


1 Comment »

On this date: Joey Galloway traded for two first-round draft choices

Joey Galloway

A look at some memorable moments in Seahawks history that occurred on Feb. 12:

2000: Joey Galloway is traded to the Cowboys for first-round draft choices in 2000 and 2001, picks the Seahawks use to select Shaun Alexander and Koren Robinson.

2003: John Marshall is hired as linebackers coach on Mike Holmgren’s staff.

2006: Matt Hasselbeck completes 10 of 17 passes for 85 yards as the NFC wins the Pro Bowl 23-17 in a defense-dominated game that features 10 turnovers and seven sacks. Lofa Tatupu has a team-high six tackles, as well as two more on special teams, while Walter Jones, Steve Hutchinson, Mack Strong and Robbie Tobeck help the NFC convert eight of 18 third-down situations and control the ball for 32 minutes.


Marshawn Lynch, Max Unger, Richard Sherman, Earl Thomas named All-Pro

Richard Sherman

STONE MOUNTAIN, Ga. – The Seahawks have landed four players on the All-Pro team that is selected by the Associated Press, it was announced this morning.

There were two on offense – running back Marshawn Lynch and center Max Unger; and two on defense – cornerback Richard Sherman and free safety Earl Thomas. This is the first time any of them have been selected All-Pro, but Lynch, Unger and Thomas were voted to the Pro Bowl last month.Marshawn Lynch

Sherman received 39 of a possible 50 votes, while Thomas got 28, Lynch 24 and Unger 16.

The Seahawks are in Georgia for tomorrow’s NFC divisional playoff game against the Falcons in Atlanta.

The four-player contingent matches the largest in franchise history. In 2005, the season the Seahawks made their Super Bowl run, running back and league MVP Shaun Alexander, left guard Steve Hutchinson, left tackle Walter Jones and fullback Mack Strong made the All-Pro team. The 1984 team had three players selected – kicker Norm Johnson, nose tackle Joe Nash and strong safety Kenny Easley, with wide receiver Steve Largent and cornerback Dave Brown getting second-team honors.

Max Unger“That is taking individuals and saying they are the best in the NFL at that position and that’s what I wanted to be,” Sherman said. “The Pro Bowl is taking three from each side, it’s more of a popularity contest. The All-Pro, you’re the best at your position. It doesn’t matter if you’re a fifth-rounder or fourth-rounder or undrafted. If you play the best, you’re All-Pro.”

Unger took the opposite view, saying that the Pro Bowl means more because the squad is selected by other players and coaches in the league – as opposed to the media members who vote on the All-Pro team.

“To have other players say you’re the best at your position, that really means something,” Unger said, and then added with a smile, “But being named All-Pro is pretty cool, too.”

Unger, Thomas and Sherman are the first players in franchise history at their positions to be named first team All-Pro. Lynch joins Alexander as the only running back to be named first-team All-Pro, and Alexander also made the second team in 2004. Curt Warner was a second-team selection three times (1983, 1986 and 1987), while Chris Warren got second-team status twice (1994 and 1995).Earl Thomas

Jones holds the franchise record with four first-team selections (2001, 2004-05 and 2007), and he was a second-team pick in 2008. Defensive tackle Cortez Kennedy and Easley were named to the first team three times – 1992-94 for Kennedy, who also was a second-team selection 1996; 1983-85 for Easley. Largent made the second team four times (1978-79, 1984 and 1987).

You can find the entire All-Pro team here.


On this date: Alexander paces win over 49ers

A look at some memorable moments in Seahawks history that occurred on Nov. 20:

Shaun Alexander

Seahawks running back Shaun Alexander on Sunday, November 20, 2005, in San Francisco, Calif. The Seahawks defeated the 49ers 27-25. (AP Photo/Al Golub)

1977: The Seahawks are held to 129 total yards, including a 2-of-15, 19-yard passing effort by Jim Zorn, in a 22-10 loss to the Oilers at the Kingdome.

1983: Dave Krieg passes for 420 yards and three touchdowns and Paul Johns catches nine passes for 116 yards, but it’s not enough in a 38-27 loss to the Broncos in Denver. The Seahawks then won three of their last four games to advance to the playoffs for the first time in Chuck Knox’s first season as coach.

1994: Mack Strong scores on a 7-yard run with 42 seconds remaining in a 22-21 victory over the Buccaneers at the Kingdome. Chris Warren also runs for 116 yards.

2005: The 49ers score the final 13 points, but the Seahawks hang on for a 27-25 victory in San Francisco – win No. 6 in what will become a franchise-record 11-game winning streak. Shaun Alexander runs for 115 yards and two touchdowns.


Comments Off

On this date: Neck injury ends Strong’s career

A look at a memorable moment in Seahawks history that occurred on Oct. 7:

2007: Fullback Mack Strong, who is playing in his 201st game for the Seahawks, suffers a career-ending neck injury in a loss to the Steelers in Pittsburgh. Only Joe Nash played in more games (218) and for more seasons (15) with the Seahawks than Strong (201 games and 14 seasons).


Comments Off

On this date: Mirer, Warren lead back-to-back road wins

A look at some memorable moments in Seahawks history that occurred on Sept. 11:

1971: Mack Strong, a two-time Pro Bowl selection and the fullback on the Seahawks’ 35th Anniversary team, was born in Columbus, Ga. Strong would join the Seahawks in 1993 and spend his rookie season on the practice squad. From 1994-2007, he played in 201 games – second in franchise behind Je Nash (218); and blocked for a trio of 1,000-yard rushers – Chris Warren, Rickey Watters and Shaun Alexander.

1983 – The Seahawks win their first game under coach Chuck Knox, 17-10 over the New York Jets, as Curt Warner rushes for 128 yards on 24 carries and the team sets a club record with 57 rushing attempts. And you wonder why they called Knox’s offense Ground Chuck.

1994 – Rick Mirer passes for three touchdowns and Chris Warren runs for three as the Seahawks beat the Raiders 38-9 in Los Angeles to post back-to-back wins on the road to open the season for the first time since 1985.


Comments Off

Thursday cyber surfing: Wilson a ‘star in the making’

Good morning. Here’s what’s “out there” about the Seahawks for today, June 28:

Mike Sando at ESPN.com passes along an interesting – and possibly insightful – comment on rookie QB Russell Wilson from Tony Softli, a former personnel evaluator for the Panthers and Rams: “(Matt) Flynn will have his hands full in a training camp competition against this star in the making.” The item also includes this pre-draft assessment from Football Outsiders of the player who ended up being the Seahawks’ third-round choice: “Considering the examples from Wilson’s junior year in the Atlantic Coast Conference where he’s effective on deep passes off play-action, throws receivers open, and improvises on the move, his potential to develop into an NFL quarterback is better than his height may indicate,” (Matt) Waldman wrote. “Still, it is reasonable to approach Wilson’s NFL prospects with skepticism. (Drew) Brees never overcame doubts from the organization that drafted him. … However, as Brees, Tom Brady, Marc Bulger, Matt Hasselbeck, Tony Romo and Kurt Warner, and several others have demonstrated, careers don’t end due to an inauspicious beginning.”

Sando also offers his thoughts on KC Joyner’s thought that cornerback Brandon Browner is among the most overrated players in the league: “Joyner pointed to the Seahawks cornerback’s league-high penalty count (19) as one indicator. He also used various coverage metrics to suggest Browner wasn’t all that good in coverage, either. I might have considered Browner’s teammate, Richard Sherman, as a superior choice to represent the NFC at season’s end. Pro Bowl voting was completed before then, of course. While Browner did commit too many penalties, those flags represented something positive, as well. Browner continually harassed opposing receivers near the line of scrimmage. Overrated or not, he was a pain to play against.” I’ll second that, and also point out that Browner led the NFL with 23 passes defensed.

And still more from Sando, he offers his “hidden treasure” for the NFC West teams and tabs the wide receivers for the Seahawks: “The Seahawks haven’t sent a player to the Pro Bowl as a full-time wide receiver since Brian Blades made it following the 1989 season. That streak appears unlikely to end anytime soon. The team invested virtually nothing in the position this offseason. A few questions persist – for example, what does Mike Williams have in store? – but with so much attention on quarterbacks and the Seattle defense, wide receiver gets my vote as a Seahawks position group that could surprise.” The Seahawks have had only two wide-outs voted to the Pro Bowl in franchise history – Steve Largent (seven times) and Blades (once).

Danny O’Neil at the Seattle Times looks at rookie offensive linemen J.R. Sweezy and Rishaw Johnson: “… There are going to be the rookies to consider, and yes, that’s going to be rookies with an ‘s’ to indicate plural. The Seahawks chose J.R. Sweezy from North Carolina State in the seventh round, and have converted him from defensive tackle into an offensive guard. When the rookie minicamp ended in early May, coach Pete Carroll gave a very positive review. … The other rookie who made a strong first impression was Rishaw Johnson, an undrafted free agent signed from California (Pa.) University, which is the same college where the Seahawks found quarterback Josh Portis a year ago.”

With school out for the summer, Pat Kirwan at CBSSports.com offers a final examine to test your retention of what happened during the 2011 NFL season: “Think you remember how it all happened? Want to test your memory and maybe learn a thing or two? Have some fun taking this 21-question, multiple-choice (guess?) quiz.”

Here at Seahawks.com, we take a look at the last of the team’s offseason workouts – and the nine rookie free agents who concluded the program this week: “Rookie free agents do face the longest of odds, as (strength and conditioning coach Chris) Carlisle said, in their attempts to earn spots on the 53-man roster or practice squad. But the Seahawks always have been good to undrafted rookies, and vice versa. The team’s honor roll of longest-odds beaters includes Ring of Honor quarterback Dave Krieg; free safety Eugene Robinson, the franchise’s all-time leading tackler; nose tackle Joe Nash, special teamer/linebacker Rufus Porter and fullback Mack Strong, who all played in the Pro Bowl during their careers and, like Robinson, were voted to the Seahawks’ 35th Anniversary team; and Doug Baldwin, the team’s leading receiver last season. ‘There are a lot of guys who came in as free-agent rookies who play in the Pro Bowl, who were Super Bowl champions, that are in Canton (at the Pro Football Hall of Fame) right now that have gone from didn’t-have-a-chance to being pretty darn special,’ Carlisle said. Carlisle’s history lesson did not fall on deaf ears. ‘This is a program that kind of breeds these undrafted free agents, and that fact is very encouraging,’ said (tight end Sean) McGrath, who was heading back to Henderson State University in Arkansas to pack up the last of his left-behind belongings before going home to the Chicago area. ‘Anything can happen. You’ve just got to put your mind to it and keep working hard.’ ”


On this date: Galloway traded

A look at the memorable moments in Seahawks history that occurred on Feb. 12:

2000: Joey Galloway is traded to the Cowboys for first-round draft choices in 2000 and 2001, picks the Seahawks use to select Shaun Alexander and Koren Robinson.

2003: John Marshall is hired as linebackers coach on Mike Holmgren’s staff.

2006: Matt Hasselbeck completes 10 of 17 passes for 85 yards as the NFC wins the Pro Bowl 23-17 in a defense-dominated game that features 10 turnovers and seven sacks. Lofa Tatupu has a team-high six tackles, as well as two more on special teams, while Walter Jones, Steve Hutchinson, Mack Strong and Robbie Tobeck help the NFC convert eight of 18 third-down situations.


Cyber surfing: Tuesday

Good morning. Here’s what’s “out there” about the Seahawks for today, Dec. 27:

Eric Williams at the News Tribune looks at some of the unsung heroes for the Seahawks who deserve to have their praise sung: “Two who stand out most are wide receiver Doug Baldwin and cornerback Brandon Browner. Baldwin, an undrafted rookie free agent out of Stanford, leads the team in receptions with 48 and in receiving yardage with 748. He has four TD catches. He is on pace to finish the season as the first undrafted rookie since 1960 to lead his team in both receptions and receiving yards. Browner, a CFL standout and Oregon State product, signed a futures contract in January. One of the tallest corners in the league, Browner is tied for fourth in the NFL with six interceptions, and he leads the league in pass deflections with 26.”

Also at the News Tribune, Dave Boling says don’t expect coach Pete Carroll to ease into the offseason, starting with Sunday’s game against the Cardinals:  “With a win, the Seahawks finish 8-8, their first non-losing season since 2007. Also, it would give them a second-consecutive sweep of Arizona and second place in the division behind San Francisco. ‘Heck, yeah, we want to win the football game,’ Seahawks coach Pete Carroll said Monday in his press conference at team headquarters. ‘There’s no other agenda at all other than to win the football game.’ So, no, they won’t be giving JV guys playing time to earn their letters, or dumbing down their schemes.”

Danny O’Neil at the Seattle Times also looks at what’s at stake in the Seahawks’ season finale against the Cardinals: “But Carroll insisted Monday he isn’t looking down the road four months to the draft let alone considering evaluating the lower tiers of the depth chart. ‘To look at something for the future is not what’s in our minds at all,’ Carroll said. ‘We want to come back and play another good game of football.’ The winner of Sunday’s game in Arizona will finish in second place in the NFC West. Stop snickering. That’s actually an accomplishment this year.”

O’Neil also has “Three Things we Learned” from Saturday’s loss to the 49ers, including this one: “The turnaround in Seattle’s running game is for real. When the Bears stymied the Seahawks ground game in Week 14, you had to wonder whether Seattle’s rushing success in the second-half of the season was at least partly due to circumstance. Yes, Seattle had run the ball well against Dallas and Baltimore – two well-regarded run defenses – but the Seahawks had also faced the Rams (twice) and the Eagles. On Saturday, the Seahawks became the first team to rush for a touchdown against San Francisco this year, and Marshawn Lynch became the first player in 25 months to gain 100 yards on the ground against the 49ers. Consider that Seattle did all that without three starters on the offensive line, it’s a validation of the progress Seattle has made on the ground.”

John Boyle at the Everett Herald looks at how the Seahawks have become more competitive in their second season under Carroll: “Despite winning the division last year, the Seahawks lost by at least 16 points in all nine of their regular season defeats. In 2009, the Seahawks lost six games by 17 or more points and four by 24 or more. This year the Seahawks have been beaten by double digits four times, but their other four losses were by a combined 13 points. Overall this season, the Seahawks have outscored opponents by nine points. Last year they were outscored by 97 points, so barring a 106-point loss in Arizona, which seems pretty darn unlikely, Seattle will improve on that front, win or lose.”

Also at the Herald, Scott Johnson continues his “The Game of my Life” series with a look at fullback Mack Strong: “ ‘Spite,’ the Seattle Seahawks’ longtime fullback said when asked why he chose to play in the Pacific Northwest way back in 1993. Having been spurned by his hometown team, the Atlanta Falcons, in the 1993 NFL draft, Strong said no to a free-agent contract with that team and decided to go as far away as possible. So he landed in Seattle, a city he had never before visited. He hardly even knew anything about the Seahawks, other than a wide receiver named Steve Largent who recently retired and a young defensive stud named Cortez Kennedy whose name Strong had heard in passing. Still, Strong was determined to make it work in his new home. Fifteen NFL seasons later, all of which were played with the Seahawks, Mack Strong not only made the most of his opportunity but became a fixture in the city he grew to love.”

Mike Sando at ESPN.com has his “Silver Linings” from the Seahawks’ loss to the 49ers, including this one: “Seattle became the first team since Detroit on Oct. 16 to score a first-quarter touchdown against the 49ers. The Seahawks became the third team all season to score more than one red zone touchdown against the 49ers in a game.”

Sando also has a look at the draft order entering the final weekend of the regular season, with the Seahawks sitting at No. 14.

Here at Seahawks.com, we take another look at Marshawn Lynch’s historic effort against the 49ers in our “Monday Metatarsal Musings”: “From the soles of his Skittles-enhanced shoes, to the soul of what makes him a special player, Marshawn Lynch has been determined to carry the Seahawks as far as his constantly churning legs will take them. That was, as it finally turned out, not far enough, as Saturday’s two-point loss to the NFC West Champion San Francisco 49ers at CenturyLink Field ended the Seahawks’ hopes of advancing to the playoffs for the second consecutive season. But it wasn’t for a lack of Lynch trying. The Seahawks’ Skittles-munching back became the first player since the Packers’ Ryan Grant in 2009 to rush for 100 yards against the 49ers, with his 107-yard effort snapping a streak that had reached 36 games. Lynch also became the first player this season to score a rushing touchdown against the 49ers’ top-rated run defense, and his 4-yard run with less than seven minutes to play gave the Seahawks a 17-16 lead. In his past eight games, Lynch has rushed for 855 of his 1,118 yards and nine of his 13 touchdowns. It only takes a few clicks of a calculator to figure out that pace over 16 games would produce a 1,700-yard, 18-TD season – and the only back in franchise history to compiles those kinds of numbers was Shaun Alexander during his league MVP season in 2005 (1,880 yards, 28 TDs).”

We’ve also got at look at how coach Pete Carroll plans to approach the season finale against the Cardinals, his thoughts on the Pro Bowl in “Monday in Hawkville” and Tony Ventrella’s video recaps of the game against the 49ers as well as Monday’s news conference.


Comments Off

On this date

A look at the memorable moments in Seahawks history that occurred on Nov. 20:

1977: The Seahawks are held to 129 total yards, including a 2-of-15, 19-yard passing effort by Jim Zorn, in a 22-10 loss to the Oilers at the Kingdome.

1983: Dave Krieg passes for 420 yards and three touchdowns and Paul Johns catches nine passes for 116 yards, but it’s not enough in a 38-27 loss to the Broncos in Denver. The Seahawks then won three of their last four games to advance to the playoffs for the first time in Chuck Knox’s first season as coach.

1994: Mack Strong scores on a 7-yard run with 42 seconds remaining in a 22-21 victory over the Buccaneers at the Kingdome. Chris Warren also runs for 116 yards.

2005: The 49ers score the final 13 points, but the Seahawks hang on for a 27-25 victory in San Francisco – win No. 6 in what will become a franchise-record 11-game winning streak. Shaun Alexander runs for 115 yards and two touchdowns.


Comments Off