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On this date: Picks push Seahawks past Redskins

A look at a memorable moment in Seahawks history that occurred on Jan. 5:

Marcus Trufant

2008: Marcus Trufant (78 yards) and Jordan Babineaux (57 yards) return interceptions for touchdowns and D.J. Hackett caps his six-catch, 101-yard day with a 20-yard TD catch – all in the fourth quarter – as the Seahawks post a 35-14 victory over the Redskins in a Wild Card playoff game in Seattle. The linebacking crew of Leroy Hill (13), Lofa Tatupu (12) and Julian Peterson (10) combine for 35 tackles and two sacks as the Seahawks host a playoff game for the fourth consecutive season after hosting three in their first 28 seasons.


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On this date: Big-play day grounds Eagles

A look at some memorable moments in Seahawks history that occurred on Nov. 23:

Bobby Joe Edmonds

Bobby Joe Edmonds

1980: Will Lewis returns a punt 75 yards for a touchdown, but the Seahawks fall to the Broncos 36-20 in Denver.

1986: The Seahawks begin a five-game winning streak as they jump to a 21-6 lead and hold on a 24-20 victory over the Eagles at the Kingdome. Dave Krieg passes 72 yards to Daryl Turner for one touchdown and Bobby Joe Edmonds returns a punt 75 yards for another. The Seahawks sack Randall Cunningham nine times, including three by Fredd Young.

2007: Matt Hasselbeck passes for five touchdowns and 333 yards as the Seahawks take leads of 27-10 and 41-24, only to have the Ravens storm back with 38 second-half points and win 44-41 in overtime. Matt Stover ties the game with a 40-yard field goal as time expired in regulation and then wins it with a 42-yarder in overtime to end the four-hour game. Darrell Jackson catches seven passes for 146 yards, including an 80-yard TD.

2008: Matt Hasselbeck throws touchdown passes to John Carlson and Maurice Morris, but Shaun Suisham kicks a 22-yard field goal midway through fourth to give the Redskins a 20-17 victory in Seattle. Julian Peterson has two sacks among his 10 tackles.


Thursday cyber surfing: Two weeks until the NFL Draft

Good morning. Here’s what’s “out there” about the Seahawks for today, April 12:

Pete Prisco at CBSSports.com offers his draft needs for the Seahawks, in the website’s on-going examination of all 32 teams: “When league scouts talk about the Seahawks, they all say the same thing: Loads of young talent, but what about the quarterback? Under coach Pete Carroll, the Seahawks have tried Charlie Whitehurst (failed) and Tarvaris Jackson (grade incomplete) as quarterbacks they acquired to fill a glaring need. Now comes Matt Flynn. The Seahawks signed Flynn as a free agent from the Green Bay Packers. Flynn started two games in four years with the Packers, so his signing is risky. Carroll said that Flynn and Jackson will compete for the job, but it’s probably Flynn’s to lose. If Flynn can prove to be more than just a manage-the-game passer, Seattle will push for the NFC West title. If not, they might be looking again next spring.”

Todd McShay goes deep in his fifth mock draft at ESPN.com, offering multiple options for teams. It’s an Insider feature, so requires registration and a fee. But here’s what he has to say about the Seahawks: “Scenario 1: Take (Luke) Kuechly and bring some stability to a linebacker corps that has seen the likes of Julian Peterson, Aaron Curry, David Hawthorne and others come and go in recent years. Scenario 2: With Kuechly gone, (Quinton) Coples becomes a value pick at this point and will add a versatile presence who can both pressure the quarterback and hold up against the run when his motor is running high. Scenario 3: Look to need areas elsewhere on offense with (David) DeCastro or (Michael) Floyd.”

Also at ESPN.com, former Colts GM Bill Polian, now an NFL Insider for the website, examines some possible trades in the draft: “In the weeks leading up to the draft, general managers and personnel directors around the NFL will turn their attention to a process called draft management – NFL insider speak for predicting how the draft will unfold. It’s through this process that a team anticipates where its draft targets may come off the board and ensures the selection of one of its top choices. While teams are never 100 percent accurate with these predictions, they have been able to project the first round with a high degree of certainty in recent years. That said, every draft has certain pivot points, spots where the draft veers from its anticipated path and proceeds in a new, unexpected direction. Sometimes the impetus for these moments is an off-the-radar selection, but more often it’s a trade. There are several reasons to believe the first big pivot point of the 2012 draft could come with a potential trade of the No. 3 overall pick from the Vikings to the Dolphins.”

Don Banks at SI.com has his fifth mock draft, but his selection for the Seahawks sounds familiar: Quinton Coples, DE, North Carolina. “There’s a lot to love about the young defense the Seahawks are assembling, but they’ve got to create more pressure on opposing passers. Coples could drop well into the teens, but he’s got double-digit sack talent if Pete Carroll and Co. can figure out how to keep his intensity and effort level high at all times.”

Here at Seahawks.com, we begin our series of articles previewing the NFL Draft with a look at the team’s situation, through the eyes of general manager John Schneider: “ ‘There are tons of mock drafts, and I’d be lying if I told you I didn’t look at them,’ Schneider said. ‘But it’s not that easy. We build our (draft) board based on our team and what we have currently. So we compare these players to our current roster, and that’s how we build our board. We don’t build our board for the league, per say.’ And definitely not to appease those who compile mock drafts. ‘So while people in a mock draft might feel like we need a certain position or a specific player, it’s just really who has the highest grade – and if it fills a specific need, that’s great,’ Schneider said. ‘But it’s a grade comparable to what our team is and how we see our own players at each position. That’s why it’s so important to know your team and evaluate your team first and foremost.’ ”

The do-over draft series at NFL.com has reached 2009, when the Seahawks made Aaron Curry the fourth pick overall. In the do-over, Jason Smith gives them Clay Matthews: “All you need to know here is that after just two seasons the Seahawks shipped Curry to the Raiders for a seventh-round pick and a conditional selection. (And this guy was actually in the mix to be No. 1 overall for a little while!) How much more teeth would there be in that Seahawks defense with Matthews? A Pro Bowler all three years in the league and he was first-team All Pro in 2010. And that hair, my gosh, I would’ve re-done the pick if I was just getting that part of him. I know, why not Foster? Well, Seattle thought they had their RB situation under control after having just added Julius Jones and T.J. Duckett. And now they have the Skittles Beast, so they’re all set there.”

Also at NFL.com, Chad Reuter looks at the players in this year’s draft class that could spark interest from teams looking to trade up in the first round to get them: “Due to the lack of suspense surrounding the landing points of (Andrew) Luck and (Robert) Griffin, a lot of attention has been placed on the new home of the draft’s third-rated passer, Texas A&M’s Ryan Tannehill. The Dolphins are the odds-on favorites to select the athletic and strong-armed, if inexperienced (19 collegiate starts at QB after playing receiver his first two-plus seasons on campus), passer because of their extreme need at the position. And it certainly doesn’t hurt that Miami’s new offensive coordinator, Mike Sherman, was Tannehill’s head coach at A&M.”

Former Seahawks right tackle Sean Locklear has signed with the Giants, and Aaron Wilson at Scout.com has the report: “The 6-foot-4, 310-pounder played last season for the Washington Redskins and played in eight games with four starts after spending the previous seven years with the Seattle Seahawks. Locklear has played in 105 regular-season games with 82 starts.”


On this date: New uniforms unveiled

A look at the memorable moments in Seahawks history that occurred on March 27:

2002: The Seahawks’ new uniforms are unveiled during a presentation at the team’s new stadium. The new look includes blue helmets, after 76.6 percent of the 64,513 fans who voted in a weeklong contest opted for the switch from silver helmets – the first time in NFL history that fans chose part of a team’s ensemble.

2006: Pro Bowl linebacker Julian Peterson is signed as an unrestricted free agent. A Pro Bowl selection in 2002 and 2003 with the NFC West rival 49ers, Peterson would be voted to the Pro Bowl in each of his three seasons with the Seahawks.


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On this date: Peterson traded

A look at a memorable moment in Seahawks history that occurred on March 14:

2009: Pro Bowl linebacker Julian Peterson is traded to the Lions for defensive lineman Cory Redding and a fifth-round draft choice. Peterson had been signed as an unrestricted free agent in 2006. He started 47 games in three seasons with the Seahawks, and was voted to the Pro Bowl each season while producing 10 sacks in ’06, 9.5 sacks in 2007 and 86 tackles in 2008.


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On this date

A look at a memorable moment in Seahawks history that occurred on Jan. 5:

2008: Marcus Trufant (78 yards) and Jordan Babineaux (57 yards) return interceptions for touchdowns and D.J. Hackett caps his six-catch, 101-yard day with a 20-yard TD catch – all in the fourth quarter – as the Seahawks post a 35-14 victory over the Redskins in a wild-card playoff game in Seattle. The linebacking crew of Leroy Hill (13), Lofa Tatupu (12) and Julian Peterson (10) combine for 35 tackles and two sacks as the Seahawks host a playoff game for the fourth consecutive season after hosting three in their first 28 seasons.


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On this date

A look at the memorable moments in Seahawks history that occurred on Nov. 23:

1980: Will Lewis returns a punt 75 yards for a touchdown, but the Seahawks fall to the Broncos 36-20 in Denver.

1986: The Seahawks begin a five-game winning streak as they jump to a 21-6 lead and hold on a 24-20 victory over the Eagles at the Kingdome. Dave Krieg passes 72 yards to Daryl Turner for one touchdown and Bobby Joe Edmonds returns a punt 75 yards for another. The Seahawks sack Randall Cunningham nine times, including three by Fredd Young.

2003: Matt Hasselbeck passes for five touchdowns and 333 yards as the Seahawks take leads of 27-10 and 41-24, only to have the Ravens storm back with 38 second-half points and win 44-41 in overtime. Matt Stover ties the game with a 40-yard field goal as time expired in regulation and then wins it with a 42-yarder in overtime to end the four-hour game. Darrell Jackson catches seven passes for 146 yards, including an 80-yard TD.

2008: Matt Hasselbeck throws touchdown passes to John Carlson and Maurice Morris, but Shaun Suisham kicks a 22-yard field goal midway through fourth to give the Redskins a 20-17 victory in Seattle. Julian Peterson has two sacks among his 10 tackles.


Batting 1.000

Fredd Young is one of two players in Seahawks history who went to the Pro Bowl each season he was with the team. The other is linebacker Julian Peterson.

Young made it 4 for 4 from 1984-87 by going as a special teams player his first two seasons and then as a linebacker his final two seasons. He was traded to the Indianapolis Colts for a pair of first-round draft choice in 1988.

It’s fitting that Young went twice as a linebacker because when asked once why he had a second “D” in his first name, he offered through a smile, “It stands for defense.”

Peterson went three times in three seasons, all as a linebacker.

Here are the Top 10 players in franchise history in Pro Bowls-to-seasons played:

Player                                 Pro Bowls      Seasons       Pct.

Fredd Young                             4                  4                1.000

Julian Peterson                        3                   3                1.000

Cortez Kennedy                       8                 11                  .727

Kenny Easley                            5                   7                  .714

Walter Jones                            9                13                   .692

Steve Hutchinson                    3                  5                   .600

Steve Largent                           7               14                   .500

Lofa Tatupu                             3                  6                   .500

Warren Moon                         1                  2                   .500

Curt Warner                            3                  7                   .429


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Better than Brown?

After the Seahawks signed linebacker Chad Brown as a free agent in 1997, then-vice president of football operations Randy Mueller allowed himself a congratulatory moment.

“There’s no question this is the best signing we’ve ever had,” Mueller said.

Mueller should know, because he’d been with the team since 1983. Plan B free agency didn’t begin until 1989 and the current system started in 1993.

And Brown did nothing to let Mueller and the team down. He led the team in tackles for three consecutive seasons, was voted to the Pro Bowl twice and put up numbers during his eight-season stay in Seattle that rank among the Top 5 all-time in tackles (fourth, 744), sacks (fifth, 48), fumble recoveries (third, 13) and fumble returns for a touchdown (first, 3).

But that watershed signing of Brown happened 15 year ago. Has the club added a free agent since that would make Mueller alter his assessment? (You tell us below…)

Here, in chronological order, are a dozen candidates – including Brown, of course:

LB Chad Brown (1997) – see above.

QB Warren Moon (1997) – He started 24 games in two seasons, posting an 11-13 record. In ’97, he passed for 3,678 yards (third-highest in club history) and 25 touchdowns, including a club record-tying five in a 409-yard passing performance against the Raiders – three weeks shy of his 41st birthday.

RB Ricky Watters (1998) – He led the team in rushing for three consecutive seasons (1998-2000) and his 4,009 yards rank No. 5 on the team’s all-time list. He also scored 22 rushing touchdowns, which also ranks No. 5, and averaged 51 receptions from ’98-2000.

OL Chris Gray (1998) – Signed to add depth to the offensive line, he started 145 games in 11 seasons – at three different positions (center, right guard and left guard). Including in his unexpected run were a club-record 121 consecutive starts from 1999-2006.

P Jeff Feagles (1998) – He was one of the best directional punters in the league during his five-year stint with the Seahawks. He ranks second on the club’s all-time list in career punts (385) and third in career average (42.1 yards). He averaged 44.1 yards in 1998 and had 34 punts downed inside the 20 in 1999.

C Robbie Tobeck (2000) – Like Brown, Tobeck was voted to the 35th Anniversary team. He started 88 games from 2000-06 and was the QB of the line during the team’s run of winning the division title four consecutive seasons (2004-07) and advancing to the playoffs five years in a row (2003-07).

WR Bobby Engram (2001) – He holds the club record for receptions in a season (94 in 2007) and was the leading receiver on the 2005 Super Bowl team. Engram, who was voted to the 35th Anniversary team as the third wide-out, ranks fifth in career receptions (399) and fourth in receiving yards (4,859).

DT John Randle (2001) – He played the final two seasons of his Hall of Fame career with the Seahawks, and made the most of them. Randle led the team in sacks in 2001 (11), when he was voted to the Pro Bowl; as well as in 2002 (7).

WR-KR Nate Burleson (2006) – Voted to the 35th Anniversary team as the punt returner, Burleson also finished second on the team in receptions in 2009 (63) and 2007 (50). He is the club record-holder in career punt returns (125) and return yardage (1,288), and had scoring returns of 94 and 90 yards.

LB Julian Peterson (2006) – He was voted to the Pro Bowl in each of this three seasons with the Seahawks (2006-08) and had 19½ sacks in his first two seasons, including team-leading 10 in 2006. He also averaged 83 tackles.

DE Patrick Kerney (2007) – He led the NFC with 14½ sacks in 2007, when he also was voted to the Pro Bowl and All-Pro. Injuries limited him to 16 starts combined in the next two seasons, but he still led the team in sacks in 2009 (five). He’s also the reason Grant Wistrom, Bryce Fisher and Chike Okeafor didn’t make this list.

K Olindo Mare (2008) – He has been the team’s leading scorer in each of his first three seasons with the Seahawks, and holds the franchise record for consecutive field goals made (30 in 2009-10). His mark is the sixth-longest in NFL history, and 14 more than the second-best streak in club history.

The other 11 are definitely worth considering. But better than Brown? You make the call.