On this date: First step toward securing Seahawks taken

A look at a memorable moment in Seahawks history that occurred on June 15:

1972: Seattle Professional Football, a group of business and community leaders, announces its intention to attempt to secure a National Football League franchise. Herman Sarkowsky served as the spokesman for the group, which also included eventual majority owner Lloyd Nordstrom. The NFL announced on June 4, 1974, that Seattle would have a franchise for the 1976 season.


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Monday cyber surfing: Father’s Day memories, and quarterbacks

Good morning. Here’s what’s “out there” about the Seahawks for today, June 18:

To celebrate Father’s Day, we wondered what it was like growing up with Pete Carroll as your father. So we asked Nate Carroll, a defensive assistant on the Seahawks’ coaching staff headed by his father: “On this Father’s Day what better way to salute the father figure of the Seahawks than by taking a stroll down memory lane with the youngest of coach Pete Carroll’s three grown children. Growing up the son of a football coach also can make for some less-than-fond memories, because the occupation can easily lead to preoccupation. But that’s not how Nate remembers it ‘When he came home, it wasn’t ‘head coach dad,’ it was dad,’ said Nate Carroll, now 25 and a defensive assistant on his father’s staff. ‘He could flip the switch when he came home, which was awesome.’ For example? ‘I don’t like saying this, but as a child I used to think my dad wasn’t all that smart because he used to play dumb for me,’ Nate said. ‘I was always too smart for my own good, so I was like, ‘My dad’s just not that smart.’ But I came to realize he was just trying to relate to me as much as possible. It was awesome, and I thank him for that.’ ”

John Boyle at the Everett Herald not only looks at the Seahawks’ three-man QB competition, he warns readers of that fact: “Warning: You are about to read about the Seahawks’ quarterbacks competition. This is not the first time you have read about this topic, nor will it be the last. You will continue to read/see/hear countless stories about Seattle’s three-way QB competition between now and September. So, if you’re already tired of this quarterback talk, well, sorry. Things are only going to get worse in the coming months. Much worse.”

Here at Seahawks.com, we also look at the continuing competition between Tarvaris Jackson, Matt Flynn and Russell Wilson: “One by one, Tarvaris Jackson, Matt Flynn and Russell Wilson continued to take their turns quarterbacking the No. 1 offense at the Seahawks’ just-concluded three-day minicamp. One at a time, they stepped to the podium this week for post-practice Q&A sessions, where they said all the right things but also made it clear there will be no backing down before coach Pete Carroll and his offensive staff decide just which QB will lead the team in the 2012 season. But no one has yet to take a discernible lead in this arms race. ‘I can’t tell you that there’s anything that’s happened other than to say we’ll stay with the same format going into (training) camp,’ Carroll said Thursday. ‘I don’t think that will change. T-Jack will go first and away we go. But other than that, let the games begin. We’ll be really excited to see what happens.’ ”

We’ve also got a look at how the Seahawks became the Seahawks in our “On This Date” series: “It happened in 1975, when ‘Seahawks’ was selected from 1,741 different names that were suggested by 20,365 entries. ‘It’s overwhelming, simply overwhelming,’ then-managing general partner Herman Sarkowsky said at the time. ‘We expected only about one-tenth this many entries.’ ”

Gary Horton of Scouts Inc. ranks his 10 most versatile players in the NFC, and Leon Washington checks in at No. 10. It’s an Insider feature at ESPN.com, so requires registration and a fee, but here’s what he says about the Washington who plays in Washington: “Entering his eighth season in the NFL, Washington is still a productive player in a lot of areas for the Seahawks. He is most dangerous as a returner (as an outlet receiver, he had a modest 10 receptions), and as a backup running back, he rushed for 248 yards on 53 carries. He is a shifty guy with good open-field elusiveness and dependable hands. He will likely fill in as a third-down back and see more touches in 2012.”

NFL.com celebrated Father’s Day with a photo gallery of fathers and sons, including a three-generation picture of Seahawks tight end Kellen Winslow Jr., his Hall of Fame father and his son, Jalen; and a 2002 photo of Hall of Fame defensive tackle Cortez Kennedy and his daughter, Courtney.

Len Pasquarelli of the Sports Xchange is reporting that Chris Clemons has “politely declined” the Seahawks’ offer on a contract extension, which is why the defensive end was not at last week’s mandatory minicamp in an under-the-radar move for a player who has produced 11 sacks in each of his first two seasons with the team: “That might have something to do, of course, with the fact that Seahawks play in a part of the country to which many fans don’t pay much attention, and which merits only modest media scrutiny. Or it might be because Clemons, a nine-year veteran who had started only three games with three different franchises in the seven seasons before he arrived in Seattle in 2010, isn’t particularly well-known. That said, it was a fairly significant storyline, especially for a Seattle team that could quietly challenge for a title in the relatively unleavened NFC West.”

But GM John Schneider said in an interview on 950 KJR on Saturday that talks are continuing with the Clemons: ‘ “What I can share with you guys is that we’ve had dialogue with Chris and his agent,’ Schneider said. ‘It’s all been positive. You know, he elected not to come to the camp, that’s his prerogative. He’s got a year left on his contract, he’s very talented, he’s a very important part of what we’re doing. And we’ll try to do what’s in the best interest of the organization. I think the fans recognize that he’s an important part of what we do on defense, and the 12th Man has really helped his game, too, in terms of being filled out at the stadium and allowing him to jump off the ball. Obviously we’d like to extend a number of different guys. We have several unrestricted free agents coming up that we’d like to start working on and he’s a priority.’ ”

And Eric Williams at the News Tribune cites a team source as saying Clemons’ declining the offer never happened: “However, a club source close to the situation contradicted the report, saying the Seahawks have not received a formal rejection on any deal, and the two sides continue to negotiate.”

For a look at the rest of the league, including LaDainian Tomlinson signing with San Diego so he can retire a Charger, there’s Peter King’s “Monday Morning Quarterback” at SI.com. He’s also got more on Brian Banks, the linebacker who had a tryout last week with the Seahawks, including: “When the Chiefs worked out Brian Banks this month, they put him through a scouting combine type of workout, designed to see exactly what kind of athlete he was and potential he had. Banks measured at 6-2 ½ and 239 pounds. He ran a 4.77-second 40-yard dash. There were 33 linebackers at the Scouting Combine in February; 29 ran the 40-yard dash. Banks, who hadn’t worked out seriously before being exonerated May 24 because he never thought he’d ever have a chance to play pro football after 10 years away from the game, ran a faster 40 than eight of the 29 prospects, including running faster than five of the inside linebackers running for their NFL lives in Indianapolis.”


How the Seahawks got their name

So, how did the Seahawks become the Seahawks?

It’s a timely question, because today is the anniversary of the nickname “Seahawks” being selected for Seattle’s NFL franchise. It happened in 1975, when “Seahawks” was selected from 1,741 different names that were suggested by 20,365 entries.

“It’s overwhelming, simply overwhelming,” then-managing general partner Herman Sarkowsky said at the time. “We expected only about one-tenth this many entries.”

Here are some of the, well, better and more original suggestions:

Aardvarks

Aleuts

Aero-Techs

About Timers

Anchovies

Alkis

Asters Domes

Abominable Snowmen

Alki Ants

Apple Knockers

Aqua-Ducks

Bunyan

Bumbershoots

Buffalo Chips

Belaying Pins

Billy Goats

Clouds

Cloudbursts

D.B. Coopers

Bigfoots

Clam Diggers

Catamounts

Buzz Saws

Blue Sounders and Sounders

Bronze Bobcats

Bay Hawks

Cool Dudes

City Slickers

Cockatoos

Cumulo Nimbos

Crabs

Cutthroats

Chowderheads

Domebusters

Diarrheas

Frogs

Green State Geoducks

Green Giants

Go-E-Ducks

Dogwoods

Drizzlers

Ferrys

Flounders

Gnomes

Ding Dongs

Dreadnaughts

Fruits Pickers

Flying Wedges

Ferrets

Chinook Passers

Daffy Ducks

Electric Loggers

Hammerheads

Harpooners

Halibut Heads

Ichi Ban

Koala Bears

Killer Whales

Mongooses

Herman’s Hermits

Hydrofoils

Identified Flying Objects

Kelpers

Kilowatts

Lucky Loggers

Microwaves

Major Domos

Igloos

King Krabs

Montlakes

Nibblers

Peckerwoods

Pachyderms

Queen City Quinaults

Nutcrackers

Playwrights

Nordy’s Best

Nanuks

Orangutans

O-Zones

Puget Puffers

Puddle Jumpers

Pacific Crests

Pike Street Misfits

Plimsoll Marks

Peacemakers

Quicksands

Rainbirds

Rainy Ramblers

Rain-Dears

Sodbusters

Spunkies

Running Salmon

Spittoons

Sea Urchins

Salty Dogs

Sheep

747’s

Raining Suns

Rain Gods

Rainbeams

Red Tide

Roaches

Roosters

Silver Sasquatches

Skeletons

Sardines

Royal Broughams

Roostertails

Rain-Beaux

Rain Hawks

Sperm Whales

Sleazies

Sonics

Snowflakes

Sourdoughs

Squids

Snorkels

Sinbads

Salamanders

Sun Dodgers

Scoundrels

Shamans

Sky Hawks

Stiletoes

Space Needlers

Scampi

Superscenics

Sawdust Eaters

Spodiodees

Ticks

Soggies

Tremites

Saints ‘n Sinners

Shrimps

Toads

Undertow

Waumpums

Weather Beaters

Woodpeckers

Third Degree

Water Hawks

Yogas

Zonkers

Trafficjammers

Tatooshes

Vampires

Washington Georges

White Roosters

Zodiacs


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On this date: Seattle takes first step toward acquiring franchise

A look at a memorable moment in Seahawks history that occurred on June 15:

1972: Seattle Professional Football, a group of business and community leaders, announces its intention to attempt to secure a National Football League franchise. Herman Sarkowsky served as the spokesman for the group, which also included eventual majority owner Lloyd Nordstrom. The NFL announced on June 4, 1974, that Seattle would have a franchise for the 1976 season.


Comments Off