On this date: Seahawks win lottery, select Brian Bosworth

Brian Bosworth

A look at a memorable moment in Seahawks history that occurred on June 12:

1987: The Seahawks win the lottery for the first pick in the supplemental draft and select University of Oklahoma linebacker Brian Bosworth. The move cost the team its first-round pick in the 1988 NFL Draft. The colorful, and controversial, Bosworth – aka “The Boz” – would start 24 games in three seasons before a shoulder injury ended his career. He had 78 tackles as a rookie, to finish second on the team behind Pro Bowl linebacker Fredd Young (99); and 82 in 1988, which ranked third behind free safety Eugene Robinson (114) and linebacker Dave Wyman (97).


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On this date: Done in by Bradshaw

A look at some memorable moments in Seahawks history that occurred on Dec. 4:

Terry Bradshaw

Terry Bradshaw (AP Photo/NFL Photos)

1977: Jim Zorn throws touchdown passes to Sam McCullum (65 yards) and Steve Largent (30), but Terry Bradshaw runs for two scores and throws for a third in the Steelers’ 30-20 victory in Pittsburgh.

1983: Tony Dorsett runs for 117 yards and two touchdowns for the Cowboys, while Dave Krieg is sacked eight times and throws two interceptions in a 35-10 loss in Dallas.

1988: Robert Perryman scores on a 1-yard run midway through the third quarter, giving the Patriots a 13-7 victory over the Seahawks in New England. The Seahawks gain only 65 total yards, while Eugene Robinson (17 tackles), Darren Comeaux (11), Dave Wyman (10) and Jeff Bryant (10) pace the defensive effort.

1989: Dave Krieg passes 51 yards to John L. Williams for a fourth quarter touchdown as the Seahawks pull out a 17-16 victory over the Bills at the Kingdome on “Monday Night Football.”


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On this date: Johnson kicks Oilers, twice

A look at some memorable moments in Seahawks history that occurred on Dec. 2:

Norm Johnson

1979: The Seahawks run for three touchdowns and Steve Largent catches nine passes for 120 yards, but it’s a too-little-too-late effort as the Chiefs take a 37-7 lead and hold on for a 37-21 victory at Arrowhead Stadium.

1984: The Seahawks cap an eight-game winning streak with a 38-17 victory over the Lions at the Kingdome as Dave Krieg passes for a club-record five touchdowns, including two each to Steve Largent and Daryl Turner.

1990: Norm Johnson kicks a 39-yard field goal to tie the game and then a 42-yarder in overtime to win it as the Seahawks grab a 13-10 victory over the Oilers at the Kingdome. Dave Wyman recovered a Tony Woods-forced fumble at the Oilers’ 27-yard line to set up Johnson’s game-winner.

2007: Lofa Tatupu intercepts three passes and has 11 tackles, while Maurice Morris scores on a 45-yard touchdown run in the third quarter to give the Seahawks a 28-24 victory over the Eagles in Philadelphia.


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Monday in Hawkville: Seahawks return rested and energized

A recap of the activities at Virginia Mason Athletic Center for Nov. 19:

FOCUS ON

Russell Wilson

The day after having the bye week off. The Seahawks held their first full practice since Nov. 9, a “Bonus Monday” session where they began focusing on Sunday’s game against the Dolphins in Miami.

They were refreshed, rested and energized. And it showed.

“It was fun to be back,” coach Pete Carroll said. “These guys, I think, really appreciated the break. They’re fired up about our prospects of doing something good here. They came back with a lot of energy and they feel really good, like you would expect.

“You could tell. You could tell just by the way they ran around today that they had a lot of spring in their step.”

The Seahawks now need to use the rest from the bye week, coupled with the momentum gained from winning their past two games, as a springboard toward “doing something good here,” as Carroll put it.

And that was the emphasis in his message to the players as they gathered for a team meeting at noon.

“We need to take advantage of the beak by coming back and practicing really well this week and getting all the little things done,” Carroll said. “One of the things that can get lost is that you have all your discipline and you have all of the timing down, just because you might feel like you do.

“I don’t want to take that for granted. So the discipline that we execute this week, starting on Wednesday – it started today – is crucial. We’ve got to go out and play really good football and we want to continue to do that. Which means the timing. That means the line of scrimmage. That means penalties. That means taking care of the football. All of those things are really what’s at hand right now.”

There was that thought in the locker room after the pre-bye win over the Jets that the Seahawks were on a roll and the week off might interrupt the momentum. But to a player, they agreed today that the break and the rest that came with it were needed and beneficial.

“It can throw you off. You can get thrown out of whack because you’re in those routines, and though they’re routines hopefully they’re good routines and habits,” Carroll said. “So I’m not taking it for granted that we’ve just got it nailed and we’re back in full steam again.

“I want to make sure that this is a very strict week and very disciplined week to make sure that we recapture the timing and the things we’ve been doing.”

INJURY UPDATE

Left guard James Carpenter was the only player who did not participate in today’s practice, which was held in the indoor practice facility for obvious reasons. Carpenter still has more tests to take, Carroll said, before he can he cleared to return to practice.

“We’ll find out Wednesday if he’s cleared to go,” Carroll said.

Strongside linebacker K.J. Wright was back after missing the pre-bye game against the Jets as well as most of the game against the Vikings the week before because of a concussion.

“We’re very fortunate right now,” Carroll said. “We’re very fortunate to be this healthy at this point. Hopefully we’ll make the most of it.”

STATS ’N STUFF

The Seahawks didn’t play over the weekend, but some things didn’t change.

Marshawn Lynch remains No. 2 in the league in rushing with 1,005 yards – 123 behind Adrian Peterson of the Vikings, who also had their bye. Buccaneers’ rookie Doug Martin did close the gap and now is just 5 yards behind Lynch. Peterson (1,283) and Lynch (1,142) slipped to second and third in total yards behind Martin (1,319).

Russell Wilson also remained No. 12 in the league is passer rating (90.5), and is No. 6 in fourth-quarter passer rating (96.2).

Jon Ryan is No. 4 in punting average (49.0) and third in net average (42.5), while Leon Washington is tied for seventh in kickoff return average (28.3).

Richard Sherman is tied for fourth in interceptions (four), while Bruce Irvin continues to lead all rookies in sacks (seven).

The Seahawks actually improved one spot in total defense to No. 3, allowing an average of 296.8 yards. They are No. 2 against the pass and No. 12 against the run. They also are No. 6 in rushing offense, but No. 26 overall because they’re last in passing offense.

STAT DU JOUR

This one comes from NFC West blogger Mike Sando at ESPN.com and it’s even a day old, but it also definitely is worth repeating: Wilson is the only non-offensive lineman in the NFC West to play every offensive snap for his team this season.

UP NEXT

The players will have their usual off day on Tuesday before returning on Wednesday to continue preparing for Sunday’s game against the Dolphins.

Looking even farther down the week, the Sunday forecast in Miami is calling for a high of 76 degrees with zero percent chance of precipitation.

YOU DON’T SAY

“In a copy-cat league where personnel decisions and play-calling never gets very far out of the box, (GM John) Schneider and Carroll buck traditional, safe decision-making and do what they believe in. If you have no other reason to root for the Seahawks, there’s a good place to start.” – former Seahawks linebacker and now 710 ESPN analyst Dave Wyman in this piece posted
at mynorthwest.com


Tuesday in Hawkville: Adams’ plays prove contagious

A recap of the activities at the Seahawks’ Bing training camp for Aug. 14:

FOCUS ON

Phillip Adams. Hard work pays off. Just look at Adams, the third-year cornerback from South Carolina State.

All he did in today’s two-hour, 15-minute practice was intercept not just one but two passes. On the first, rookie linebacker Korey Toomer tipped a Russell Wilson pass near the goal line and Adams controlled the carom as he was falling to the turf. On the second, Adams locked in on a pass shortly after it left Matt Flynn’s hand and was able to get to the ball before wide receiver Kris Durham.

“We go out here and we practice hard every day,” Adams said. “We just continue to work at it every day.”

Last week, Adams got a chance to work with in the starting secondary, as Pro Bowl cornerback Brandon Browner was given a day off. Did that help Adam’s confidence?

“You have to be confident as a player, and this whole defense is confident,” Adams said.

Now that is an understatement. Practice can take on a feeding-frenzy feel as one defender tries to outdo the play that was just made by another defender. Today, that included a long-armed reach by cornerback Richard Sherman to swat away a deep pass by Flynn that was intended for Sidney Rice. And a near interception of a screen pass by defensive tackle Jason Jones. And another near interception by Sherman. And an end-zone interception by Pro Bowl strong safety Kam Chancellor. And rookie safety DeShawn Shead shielding Terrell Owens from an underthrown pass in the end zone.

“It’s like a domino effect,” Adams said. “We feed off each other. One person makes a play; it makes the other person want to make a play. So it becomes a feeding frenzy after awhile.”

ROOKIE WATCH

Bobby Wagner. After progressing even faster than the coaches had expected during the spring OTA practices and the first two weeks of training camp, the next question regarding the second-round draft from Utah State was: How would Wagner handle the duties that go with playing middle linebacker in Saturday night’s preseason opener against the Titans?

The simple answer: Better than expected. Again.

“He was very comfortable in the game; was easy to talk to during the game. He wasn’t overhyped or anything,” coach Pete Carroll said. “He handled it very well. Did a great job at the line of scrimmage making his calls and will continue to grow as he just recognizes his plays more quickly.

“He’s on track, and we all feel he has a chance to be the starter. We went in with that hope. Now we see that it’s possible and we clearly are supporting the fact that that might happen.”

POSITION WATCH

Center. John Moffitt, the right guard who has been getting work as the backup center, is out because of a sore left elbow. Lemuel Jeanpierre, the incumbent back to starter Max Unger, strained a groin during practice.

So how did the coaches handle the snapping chores? Unger got some double duty, while left guard Paul McQuistan and rookie guard Rishaw Johnson also filled the center spot – without snapping the ball. When either McQuistan or Johnson was at center, he would turn and hand the ball to the quarterback before the snap would have been made.

PLAYS OF THE DAY

Offense: Braylon Edwards making a falling grab of a Flynn pass in the back corner of the end zone behind Browner.

Defense: Despite all the above mentioned plays by the defense, the one that really stood out was 330-pound end Red Bryant breaking free on a pass play. But rather than rush the QB, Bryant mirrored Tarvaris Jackson’s movement and then went up to deflect the pass. Defensive coordinator Gus Bradley saluted the effort by yelling, “Hey Red, helluva play.”

IN ’N OUT

Today’s practice was typical for the first one after a preseason game, as some players who sat out against the Titans returned and other were sidelined with injuries they got in the game.

“We had a number of guys come back,” Carroll said. “It felt good to have those guys back out and kind of give us a boost in the numbers and all.”

Back were wide receivers Doug Baldwin and Ricardo Lockette, defensive lineman Alan Branch and linebackers Barrett Ruud and Allen Bradford. Also, wide receiver Sidney Rice practiced without a red no-contact jersey for the first time.

Sitting out were Pro Bowl fullback Michael Robinson, defensive backs Jeron Johnson and Ron Parker, defensive linemen Pierre Allen and Cordarro Law, linebacker Malcolm Smith and tight end Zach Miller. Carroll said that Robinson and Johnson should return by the end of the week, but that Law has a high ankle sprain and will be sidelined longer.

Miller got a concussion against the Titans.

“(Miller) responded immediately the next day, and the day after he looked clear,” Carroll said. “But it’s the process we have to go through, and we’re going to take great care in doing that properly.”

Still sidelined: Moffitt and James Carpenter, linebacker Matt McCoy and cornerback Walter Thurmond.

SURGERY FOR MOFFITT

As expected, Moffitt had surgery today to remove particles from his left elbow that were causing him pain. He is expected to miss two to three weeks, so veteran Deuce Lutui and rookie J.R. Sweezy will continue to work at Moffitt’s spot with the No. 1 line.

“This should be a real positive thing for John,” Carroll said. “It was something that needed to be done, so we did it as fast as possible.”

UP NEXT

The last practice of camp open to the public takes place Wednesday starting at 10 a.m. You can register here to attend. A crowd of 1,421 fans attended today’s practice.

Camp breaks after a morning practice on Thursday, and the team will fly to Denver on Friday for Saturday night’s preseason game against the Broncos.

YOU DON’T SAY

“I’m always impressed when I see a rookie have poise and look like he’s in control. It’s almost like he’s back in college. I don’t know what’s going through his mind, so maybe there were some things out there that kind of threw him off, but it certainly didn’t look like it. Bobby Wagner looked like he fit right in with that defense. Really fast, he had a really nice tackle, took on some blocks really well, made some little mistakes that you see rookies do, but other than that, I thought he showed really well.” – Dave Wyman, former Seahawks linebacker and now an analyst for 710 ESPN, on the team’s rookie middle linebacker


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Friday cyber surfing: It’s all about the rookies

Good morning. Here’s what’s “out there” about the Seahawks for today, May 11:

The Seahawks’ rookies have reported and will practice today for the first of three times in their weekend minicamp. Eric Williams at the News Tribune takes a look at how coach Pete Carroll relishes this look at the rookies: “ ‘It’s going to be really cool to see these guys come together,’ Carroll said. ‘There are so many highlight players in this group of kids. We can’t wait to get them on the field with us.’ Most eyes will be on (Bruce) Irvin, a speed pass rusher, and quarterback (Russell) Wilson, two players who were considered surprise selections by national NFL observers – particularly where they were taken in the draft. For Irvin, the focus will be on how long it takes for him to develop into a consistent pass rusher and an every-down player in order to live up to his draft status. In Wilson’s case, his 5-foot-11 stature and ability to deliver accurate passes from inside the pocket will be a constant measuring stick of his success in the NFL.”

Chris Burke at SI.com takes a look at the undrafted free agents who could turn into finds for the teams that signed them, including the Seahawks: “Jermaine Kearse, WR, Washington. We’re kind of on a run of guys catching on with their local teams. Seattle fans ought to be well-aware of Kearse after a strong career at Washington. He has good size and will go over the middle — valuable traits for a team searching for WR help. Others to watch: Rishaw Johnson, G, California (Pa.); DeShawn Shead, DE, Portland State”

During a chat at ESPN.com, NFC West blogger Mike Sando fielded a question about the Seahawks’ creativity in player acquisition: “The 49ers converted Bruce Miller from college defensive end to fullback and got good play from him last season. Miller had not played offense since high school. (J.R.) Sweezy, like Miller, was a later-round pick. Teams have greater freedom to experiment with later-round choices. The key is to be creative without over-thinking things. More broadly, the concern in building around specialized or somewhat unique players – think Red Bryant for Seattle – is that specialized players can be tough to replace if injured. However, that is where staff flexibility can make up the difference. The Seahawks seem to have a good defensive staff and approach. Another potential concern relative to Sweezy is what the move represents: a clear push by an assistant coach to get a player he liked. Tom Cable also drove the selection of James Carpenter a year ago. Drafting players to fit the staff is important, but we should also watch to see if assistants have too much sway.”

Here at Seahawks.com, we take a look at the selection of linebacker Bobby Wagner in the second round, which follows a productive trend for the team: “There’s not just a precedent, it’s a productive precedent. In 2005, Lofa Tatupu – who played for Carroll at USC – was the Seahawks’ second-round draft choice. He not only started as a rookie, he was the leading tackler on the franchise’s first Super Bowl team – the first of a club-record four consecutive seasons that the too-small, too-slow Tatupu would lead the Seahawks in tackles. In 1977, Terry Beeson was a second-round draft choice, and he also led the team in tackles as a rookie – the first of three consecutive seasons Beeson would do it, including a still-franchise record 153 tackles in 1978. In 1978, Keith Butler was selected in the second round of the draft, and he became the franchise’s all-time leading tackler by the time he left after the 1987 season (a total since surpassed by Eugene Robinson). In 1987, Dave Wyman was the team’s second-round draft choice, and he finished second on the team in tackles in 1988 and 1989. In 1990, Terry Wooden was selected in the second round, and he led the team in tackles in 1991 and 1995 and finished second in 1993 and 1994 – although it was as an outside ’backer. But you get the picture; second-round linebackers have been very, very good for the Seahawks.”

We’ve also got an item on how coach Pete Carroll surprised the veterans on Thursday, as well as birthday wishes for Jim Zorn that includes a must-see NFL Films video.

Remember free agency? It’s still going on, and Jason La Canfora at NFL.com has a look at the best remaining players, and where they might fit best.


Thursday cyber surfing: And still more on Irvin

Good morning. Here’s what’s “out there” about the Seahawks for today, May 3:

Just when you thought there was nothing left to say about Bruce Irvin, former Seahawks linebacker turned 710 ESPN analyst Dave Wyman says a lot: “His speed off the edge allows him to simply run past and around offensive tackles and tight ends. Irvin said Saturday that he feels he can run forward much faster than any lineman can “kick step” backwards. He did plenty of times at West Virginia, registering 22.5 sacks over the past two seasons. Most importantly, he has the ability to do something that I haven’t seen here in Seattle since my old teammate Rufus Porter used to do it. Irvin can turn a corner at full speed. He leans his body so his shoulders are about three feet off the ground and doesn’t slow down. This leads me to believe that he understands angles, he understands that he must fight for every last inch of space in order to “get home,” and he never slows down to do it.”

Here at Seahawks.com we check in with Michael Robinson, who is altering his approach to this offseason after his first season as a fulltime lead-blocking fullback that ended with him and Marshawn Lynch playing in the Pro Bowl: “Robinson’s mindset this offseason has been to prepare himself so that he can pick up in 2012 where he left off in 2011. That started with hitting the weights earlier than usual, monitoring his caloric intake and also adding to and increasing his regiment of recovery techniques. ‘I usually would take about a month off after the season, completely,’ he said. ‘This year, I took two weeks off. I adjusted my diet a little bit to make sure I was getting the calories in me every day so I can prepare to do the workouts. Now I’m to the point where I’m doing two workouts a day. Already.’ That comes with the position, and being one of the smaller players in the league to play the position. In his matchups with Pro Bowl tacklers last season, Robinson gave up 17 pounds to Willis, 22 to Fletcher, 27 to Lewis and 35 to Urlacher. But Lynch had three of his six 100-yard rushing performances in those games, and in the Week 16 game against San Francisco he broke the 49ers’ 36-game streak of not allowing a 100-yard rusher and also was the first to score a rushing TD against them last season. ‘I always have to fill the weight on me, or it will go away (during the season),’ said Robinson, who is up to 239 pounds. ‘That’s one of the things I really had to adjust to – lifting heavy, on a consistent basis. I’m stronger than I was at this time last year. Hopefully it will pay dividends for me in the fall.’ ”

Wednesday was a sad day in the NFL for anyone who ever played with, coached, played against or just watched Junior Seau, who was found dead in his Oceanside, Calif., home. Tributes and reports are everywhere, but one of the best comes from Jim Trotter at SI.com, who covered the Chargers during Seau’s Pro Bowl-filled run in San Diego: “You have to understand: Junior Seau didn’t live in San Diego. He was San Diego. Largely because he never forgot where he came from. He grew up hard in Oceanside, fighting for food and sometimes sleeping on mattresses in the garage. It’s one reason he focused on young people and struggling families when he established his foundation in the early 1990s. For instance, each Thanksgiving he would shut down the Mission Valley restaurant bearing his name and feed families affected by domestic violence and military personnel away from home. During Christmas, the foundation partners with a local store to allow underprivileged kids an opportunity to “purchase” gifts for family members. In total the Junior Seau Foundation, which also helps young people attend college, has distributed nearly $4 million since its inception. When Seau retired for the first time, we sat in the cool air outside his restaurant and reflected on his career. When I told him that his legacy off the field would ultimately dwarf what he did on it, he stared at me and said nothing. I walked away wondering if he truly understood how many lives he had touched with his generosity. He still seemed to measure his happiness (self worth?) by how people viewed him as a player. And now I wonder if that career didn’t contribute to his passing.”


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Monday cyber surfing: Still more Tez

Good morning. Here’s what’s “out there” about the Seahawks for today, Feb. 6:

Scott Johnson at the Everett Herald takes a walk down memory lane in the wake of Cortez Kennedy being voted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame on Saturday: “And so when I first heard the news Saturday that Kennedy had finally been granted entrance to the Pro Football Hall of Fame, I put aside my journalist suit and broke into a short celebration. Anyone who got to know Kennedy over the years, even a little bit, had to be ecstatic when the Seahawks great was honored as one of the greatest to ever play the game.”

Here at Seahawks.com, we check in with Dave Wyman and Paul Moyer for their thoughts on Cortez Kennedy being voted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame on Saturday: “But while watching all of this unfold – and all the blocking schemes he collapsed – did those around him realize they were watching a player who would end up in the Pro Football Hall of Fame? ‘That’s a great question, because while you’re there you really don’t get that feeling much,’ Dave Wyman, who played middle linebacker during Kennedy’s first three seasons, said Saturday shortly after hearing that Kennedy had been elected to the Hall. ‘But I would say with Tez, he was one of the rare guys where you did know that he was something special. It’s the cream of the cream of the crop. I always tell the story that you’re the state shot put champion and player of the year and all these things in high school. Then you’re an All-American in college. Then when you get to the pros, you’re just kind of one of the guys because everybody is so good. But then every once in awhile there’s one guy that even in the pros is just special and ahead of everybody else. That was Tez. He was that kind of player.’ ”

Brady Henderson at mynorthwest.com passes along the audio from an interview Wyman did on 710 ESPN with John Clayton of ESPN.com and also a member of the Hall of Fame selection committee on Friday: “He wasn’t lining up in gaps. He wasn’t hiding. They were triple-teaming him,” Wyman said. “It was just amazing to watch.”

As for coverage of that game that was played on Sunday, there’s Clayton’s “Last Call” at ESPN.com; Clark Judge’s “Judgements” at CBSSports.com; and Art Thiel at sportspress northwest reminds us that the Seahawks beat the Super Bowl champion Giants in Week 5, offering: “Since the Giants are the best team in football today, and three months earlier were punched out at home by the Seahawks, it means either the Giants became really good really fast, or the difference between 6-10 and 10-6 in the NFL is the breaks on a handful of plays.”


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On this date

A look at the memorable moments in Seahawks history that occurred on Dec. 4:

1977: Jim Zorn throws touchdown passes to Sam McCullum (65 yards) and Steve Largent (30), but Terry Bradshaw runs for two scores and throws for a third in the Steelers’ 30-20 victory in Pittsburgh.

1983: Tony Dorsett runs for 117 yards and two touchdowns for the Cowboys, while Dave Krieg is sacked eight times and throws two interceptions in a 35-10 loss in Dallas.

1988: Robert Perryman scores on a 1-yard run midway through the third quarter, giving the Patriots a 13-7 victory over the Seahawks in New England. The Seahawks gain only 65 total yards, while Eugene Robinson (17 tackles), Darren Comeaux (11), Dave Wyman (10) and Jeff Bryant (10) pace the defensive effort.

1989: Dave Krieg passes 51 yards to John L. Williams for a fourth quarter touchdown as the Seahawks pull out a 17-16 victory over the Bills at the Kingdome on “Monday Night Football.”


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On this date

A look at the memorable moments in Seahawks history that occurred on Dec. 2:

1979: The Seahawks run for three touchdowns and Steve Largent catches nine passes for 120 yards, but it’s a too-little-too-late effort as the Chiefs take a 37-7 and hold on for a 37-21 victory at Arrowhead Stadium.

1984: The Seahawks cap an eight-game winning streak with a 38-17 victory over the Lions at the Kingdome as Dave Krieg passes for a club-record five touchdowns, including two each to Steve Largent and Daryl Turner.

1990: Norm Johnson kicks a 39-yard field goal to tie the game and then a 42-yarder in overtime to win as the Seahawks grab a 13-10 victory over the Oilers at the Kingdome. Dave Wyman recovered a Tony Woods-forced fumble at the Oilers’ 27-yard line to set up Johnson’s game-winner.

2007: Lofa Tatupu intercepts three passes and has 11 tackles, while Maurice Morris scores on a 45-yard touchdown run in the third quarter to give the Seahawks a 28-24 victory over the Eagles in Philadelphia.


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