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On this date: Monday night magic

A look at some memorable moments in Seahawks history that occurred on Oct. 29:

1979: After trailing 14-0, the Seahawks post a 31-28 victory over the Falcons in Atlanta in the team’s first appearance on “Monday Night Football.” Dan Doornink carries the ball 21 times for 122 yards and two touchdowns.

1984: The Seahawks post their second shutout of the season, this one a 24-0 victory over the Chargers in San Diego on “Monday Night Football.” Kenny Easley sets a franchise record by intercepting three passes, while Steve Largent catches three touchdown passes.

1989: Brian Blades catches a 21-yard touchdown pass from Dave Krieg with 40 seconds to play, giving the Seahawks a 10-7 victory over the Chargers – and their 100th regular-season win. Blades finishes with 10 receptions for 117 yards in the game.

2002: Trent Dilfer is placed on injured reserve after rupturing an Achilles tendon in a 17-14 win over the Cowboys in Dallas two days earlier. Matt Hasselbeck steps back in as the starter and Jeff George is signed to fill Dilfer’s roster spot.


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On this date: Mirer to Blades wins it

A look at a memorable moment in Seahawks history that occurred on Oct. 24:

Rick MIrer

1993: Rick Mirer throws a touchdown pass to Brian Blades with 25 seconds to play to give the Seahawks a 10-9 victory over the Patriots at the Kingdome. The TD pass comes on a third down play, and the Seahawks convert three other third-down situations in the 14-play, 54-yard drive as Mirer passes to Kelvin Martin for 7 yards on third-and-4, runs for 2 yards on third-and-1 and John L. Williams runs for 3 yards on third-and-1. Blades finishes with nine receptions for 90 yards, while Rod Stephens (15) and Eugene Robinson (12) combine for 27 tackles to pace the defensive effort.


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On this date: Largent sets consecutive-catch mark

A look at the memorable moments in Seahawks history that occurred on Oct. 6:

1986: Steve Largent catches a pass in his 128th consecutive game to break the NFL record as the Seahawks beat the Chargers 33-7 in a “Monday Night Football” game at the Kingdome.

1991: Cornerback Dwayne Harper and safety Nesby Glasgow combine to stop James Brooks a yard short of a first down on a fourth-and-4 play from the Seahawks’ 22-yard line with 29 seconds left to preserve a 13-7 win over the Bengals at Riverfront Stadium.

1996: John Friesz throws touchdown passes of 51, 65 and 80 yards – the third to Brian Blades with 2:03 to play – as the Seahawks get a 22-15 win over the Dolphins in Miami.


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On this date: Mirer passes Seahawks to victory

A look at a memorable moment in Seahawks history that occurred on Sept. 22:

1996 – The Seahawks win 17-13 over the Buccaneers in Tampa as they score two touchdowns in the final three minutes – a 5-yard pass from Rick Mirer to Brian Blades and a 14-yard run by Lamar Smith with 31 seconds left in the game. Mirer is 8 of 9 for 64 yards on the 83-yard drive ending with his TD pass and also hits 4 of 5 for 54 yards during one stretch of the 61-yard drive to Smith’s TD.


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On this date: Seahawks lose opener, and Krieg to injury

A look at a memorable moment in Seahawks’ history that occurred on Sept. 1:

1991 – The Seahawks lose their season opener in New Orleans 27-24, and QB Dave Krieg for six weeks with a broken thumb. Brian Blades catches 12 passes for 160 yards and two touchdowns.


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Thursday cyber surfing: Wilson a ‘star in the making’

Good morning. Here’s what’s “out there” about the Seahawks for today, June 28:

Mike Sando at ESPN.com passes along an interesting – and possibly insightful – comment on rookie QB Russell Wilson from Tony Softli, a former personnel evaluator for the Panthers and Rams: “(Matt) Flynn will have his hands full in a training camp competition against this star in the making.” The item also includes this pre-draft assessment from Football Outsiders of the player who ended up being the Seahawks’ third-round choice: “Considering the examples from Wilson’s junior year in the Atlantic Coast Conference where he’s effective on deep passes off play-action, throws receivers open, and improvises on the move, his potential to develop into an NFL quarterback is better than his height may indicate,” (Matt) Waldman wrote. “Still, it is reasonable to approach Wilson’s NFL prospects with skepticism. (Drew) Brees never overcame doubts from the organization that drafted him. … However, as Brees, Tom Brady, Marc Bulger, Matt Hasselbeck, Tony Romo and Kurt Warner, and several others have demonstrated, careers don’t end due to an inauspicious beginning.”

Sando also offers his thoughts on KC Joyner’s thought that cornerback Brandon Browner is among the most overrated players in the league: “Joyner pointed to the Seahawks cornerback’s league-high penalty count (19) as one indicator. He also used various coverage metrics to suggest Browner wasn’t all that good in coverage, either. I might have considered Browner’s teammate, Richard Sherman, as a superior choice to represent the NFC at season’s end. Pro Bowl voting was completed before then, of course. While Browner did commit too many penalties, those flags represented something positive, as well. Browner continually harassed opposing receivers near the line of scrimmage. Overrated or not, he was a pain to play against.” I’ll second that, and also point out that Browner led the NFL with 23 passes defensed.

And still more from Sando, he offers his “hidden treasure” for the NFC West teams and tabs the wide receivers for the Seahawks: “The Seahawks haven’t sent a player to the Pro Bowl as a full-time wide receiver since Brian Blades made it following the 1989 season. That streak appears unlikely to end anytime soon. The team invested virtually nothing in the position this offseason. A few questions persist – for example, what does Mike Williams have in store? – but with so much attention on quarterbacks and the Seattle defense, wide receiver gets my vote as a Seahawks position group that could surprise.” The Seahawks have had only two wide-outs voted to the Pro Bowl in franchise history – Steve Largent (seven times) and Blades (once).

Danny O’Neil at the Seattle Times looks at rookie offensive linemen J.R. Sweezy and Rishaw Johnson: “… There are going to be the rookies to consider, and yes, that’s going to be rookies with an ‘s’ to indicate plural. The Seahawks chose J.R. Sweezy from North Carolina State in the seventh round, and have converted him from defensive tackle into an offensive guard. When the rookie minicamp ended in early May, coach Pete Carroll gave a very positive review. … The other rookie who made a strong first impression was Rishaw Johnson, an undrafted free agent signed from California (Pa.) University, which is the same college where the Seahawks found quarterback Josh Portis a year ago.”

With school out for the summer, Pat Kirwan at CBSSports.com offers a final examine to test your retention of what happened during the 2011 NFL season: “Think you remember how it all happened? Want to test your memory and maybe learn a thing or two? Have some fun taking this 21-question, multiple-choice (guess?) quiz.”

Here at Seahawks.com, we take a look at the last of the team’s offseason workouts – and the nine rookie free agents who concluded the program this week: “Rookie free agents do face the longest of odds, as (strength and conditioning coach Chris) Carlisle said, in their attempts to earn spots on the 53-man roster or practice squad. But the Seahawks always have been good to undrafted rookies, and vice versa. The team’s honor roll of longest-odds beaters includes Ring of Honor quarterback Dave Krieg; free safety Eugene Robinson, the franchise’s all-time leading tackler; nose tackle Joe Nash, special teamer/linebacker Rufus Porter and fullback Mack Strong, who all played in the Pro Bowl during their careers and, like Robinson, were voted to the Seahawks’ 35th Anniversary team; and Doug Baldwin, the team’s leading receiver last season. ‘There are a lot of guys who came in as free-agent rookies who play in the Pro Bowl, who were Super Bowl champions, that are in Canton (at the Pro Football Hall of Fame) right now that have gone from didn’t-have-a-chance to being pretty darn special,’ Carlisle said. Carlisle’s history lesson did not fall on deaf ears. ‘This is a program that kind of breeds these undrafted free agents, and that fact is very encouraging,’ said (tight end Sean) McGrath, who was heading back to Henderson State University in Arkansas to pack up the last of his left-behind belongings before going home to the Chicago area. ‘Anything can happen. You’ve just got to put your mind to it and keep working hard.’ ”


And the best second-round pick is …

Sherman Smith. Terry Beeson. Keith Butler. Brian Blades. Terry Wooden. Kevin Mawae. Lofa Tatupu. John Carlson.

Each was selected in the second round of the NFL Draft by the Seahawks. Each delivered results befitting a first-round pick. But which player was the best second-round pick in franchise history?

Smith, a quarterback at Miami of Ohio, was a member of the team’s initial draft class in 1976. After switching to running back in his rookie training camp, all he did was lead the team in rushing five times, including the Seahawks’ first four seasons. Beeson, a middle linebacker, came in the second draft in 1977 and led the team in tackles in each of his first three seasons – including a still franchise-record 153 in 1978. The following year delivered Butler, another linebacker who was the team’s all-time leading tackler when he left after the 1987 season.

In 1988, Blades was the team’s top draft choice because the Seahawks had used their first-round pick to select linebacker Brian Bosworth in the 1987 supplemental draft. But Blades led the team in receiving five times, remains No. 2 on the team’s all-time list in receptions (581) and receiving yards (7,620) behind Hall of Famer Steve Largent, was voted to the Pro Bowl in 1989 and elected to the Seahawks’ 35th Anniversary team.

Wooden, an outside linebacker, was part of the 1990 draft that was headlined by the trade to acquire Hall of Fame defensive tackle Cortez Kennedy with the third pick overall and also included running back Chris Warren and strong safety Robert Blackmon – aka “The Rookie Club.” Wooden started 87 games in seven seasons, led the team in tackles in 1991 and 1995 and also finished second twice. Mawae started at guard as a rookie in 1994 and also 1995 before moving to center in 1996 and 1997.

Carlson, a tight end who arrived in 2008, holds the franchise single-season records for the position receptions (55 in ’08), receiving yards (627 in ’08) and TD catches (seven in 2009).

But the best-of pick has to be Tatupu, who arrived in 2005 – just in time to help lead the Seahawks’ run to the Super Bowl. The middle linebacker is the only player in franchise history to lead the team in tackles four consecutive seasons (2005-08) and also was voted to three Pro Bowls.

Tatupu was released last year, Carlson spent the season on injured reserve and each is with a new team – the Falcons and Vikings, respectively. But their impact is undeniable, as each was voted to the 35th Anniversary team.

And Steve Raible definitely deserves honorable mention. A second-round pick in 1976, an injury ended Raible’s career after only six seasons, but he has remained with the Seahawks as first the analyst and now play-by-play man for team’s radio broadcasts.


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On this date: Blades drafted

A look at some memorable moments in Seahawks history that occurred on April 24:

1988: The Seahawks don’t have a first-round draft choice, but get a first-round talent when they select Brian Blades in the second round. Blades would finish his career ranked second to Steve Largent on the Seahawks’ all-time list in receptions (581) and receiving yards (7,620). He was voted to the Pro Bowl in 1989 and to the Seahawks’ 35th Anniversary team.

1994: Sam Adams is selected in the first round of the NFL Draft. He would start 66 games in his six seasons with the Seahawks.


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On this date: Another Blades is signed

A look at the memorable moments in Seahawks history that occurred on March 6:

1975: John Thompson is named the team’s first general manager. Thompson had been executive director of the NFL Management Council.

1997: Bennie Blades, a Pro Bowl safety from the Lions, signs with the Seahawks – where he joins his younger brother, Brian, who would rank No. 2 on the team’s all-time reception list by the time he retired after the 1998 season. Bennie starts nine games for the Seahawks before an injury ends his career.

1998: Brian Habib, a guard on the Broncos’ Super Bowl championship team, agrees to sign with the Seahawks in free agency.

2006: Shaun Alexander is re-signed to a multiyear contract, after being voted league MVP and leading the league in rushing and touchdowns in 2005.


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On this date: Carroll compiles staff

A look at the memorable moments in Seahawks history that occurred on Feb. 4:

1990: Dave Krieg completes 15 of 23 passes for 148 yards and a touchdown, but the NFC wins the Pro Bowl 27-21. Jerry Gray, a cornerback for the Rams who would go on to coach the Seahawks’ defensive backs in 2010, is named MVP after returning an interception 51 yards for a TD and also registering seven tackles. Rufus Porter (two tackles) and Brian Blades (one reception) also represent the Seahawks in the game.

1996: Chris Warren leads the NFC with 43 rushing yards, but the NFC wins the Pro Bowl 20-13.

1998: Jim Johnson is named linebackers coach on Dennis Erickson’s staff. Johnson remains for only one season before becoming the Eagles’ defensive coordinator, but his impact on the Seahawks’ defense is apparent even after he leaves.

2010: First-year coach Pete Carroll announces his staff: Jeremy Bates (offensive coordinator), Gus Bradley (defensive coordinator), Brian Schneider (special teams coordinator), Kippy Brown (wide receivers), Luke Butkus (quality control/offensive line), Dave Canales (quality control/offense), Chris Carlisle (head strength and conditioning), Jedd Fisch (quarterbacks), Mondray Gee (assistant strength and conditioning), Alex Gibbs (offensive line), Jerry Gray (defensive backs), Kris Richard (assistant defensive backs), Rocky Seto (quality control/defense), Sherman Smith (running backs), Jeff Ulbrich (assistant special teams), Art Valero (assistant offensive line) and Jamie Yancher (assistant strength and conditioning).


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