Thursday cyber surfing: ‘Hawks one of the most rugged teams in NFL; Banks lands in UFL

Good morning, and here’s what’s “out there” about the Seahawks for today, September 20.

Jerry Brewer of the Seattle Times says that this current physical and tough Seahawks team is one that former head coach Jim Mora would love, “After Mora was fired, Carroll and general manager John Schneider took over, and what did they immediately do? Start making the Seahawks bigger and more physical. It was a delayed dirtbagging of a football team that had become too clean. Three years later, the Seahawks are among the most rugged teams in the NFL. There’s little concern about whether they’ll push back anymore. They often push first. They excel in rushing defense and rushing offense, two areas that measure toughness. They have graduated from an undersized football team that aspired to be speedy (though it never quite got there) to an oversized squad that is still explosive despite the brawn. Teams don’t come to Seattle and punch the Seahawks in the face now. It’s too dangerous to stick your hands that close to their frothing mouths.”

Danny O’Neil of the Seattle Times has some observations on the Seahawks offense, noting that they have yet to score a first-half touchdown and two of the three field goals they have converted in the first two quarters of games were the result of turnovers, “The slow starts for the offense are reminiscent of the way Seattle began last season when it didn’t score a first-half touchdown until the fourth game. If you break down the offensive and defensive performances down by halves, it’s evident that so far this season, Seattle remains a team that struggles to get going early in games.”

Eric Williams of the Tacoma News Tribune has a look at the improvements of the NFC West division, “Since the NFL’s realignment, this is the first time that the teams from the NFC West have been 6-2 or better through the first two weeks of the season, according to Elias Sports Bureau. And the NFC West’s wins have not come against patsies. San Francisco has victories at Super Bowl contender Green Bay and at home against Detroit; Arizona defeated the Patriots in New England, where quarterback Tom Brady had not lost a home opener as a starter; Seattle handled Dallas at home in a game that most league observers thought they had no shot at winning; and St. Louis outdueled Washington and rookie quarterback Robert Griffin III.”

John Boyle of the Everett Herald details the play of the Seahawks special teams unit, who he believes set the tone against the Cowboys in Week 2, “Other than when a returner makes a big play, there is little glory on special teams. It’s grunt work that often goes unappreciated, but for the Seahawks, there is no mistaking the importance of special teams play. Carroll has long maintained that his blueprint for winning involves running the ball, winning the turnover battle, playing stout defense, and being strong on special teams. That was precisely the formula Seattle used in its win over Dallas, which is why Carroll said it was one of his most satisfying wins in Seattle, and his team’s special teams play had as much to do with his satisfaction as anything the offense and defense accomplished.”

Doug Farrar of Yahoo Sports details the next step for Brian Banks, the high school football star who was recently exonerated of a California rape case and who worked out for the Seahawks earlier this year, saying he is set to sign with the Las Vegas Locomotives of the United Football League.

In his latest edition of “Chalk Talk,” Brock Huard of mynorthwest.com breaks down Marshawn Lynch’s 36-yard run that came in the team’s 90-yard scoring drive in the win over the Cowboys.

Mike Sando of ESPN.com has a quick look at injury situations that matter around the NFC West, “The Seahawks hope to have left tackle Russell Okung back from a bruised knee to face Clay Matthews and the Green Bay defense on Monday night. Frank Omiyale started in Okung’s place Sunday and did what coach Pete Carroll called a “credible” job. For Seattle, playing one day later than usual has affected the practice schedule. Players are off Wednesday. They’ll resume practicing Thursday. Seattle will not issue an injury report until then. Carroll did tell reporters earlier in the week that receiver Sidney Rice was healthy. Rice had left the team’s game against Dallas after absorbing a hard hit. He missed some practice time last week with a sore knee.”

Here at Seahawks.com Clare Farnsworth has a look at the Seahawks’ Week 3 Monday Night Football opponent – the Green Bay Packers, and details the effectiveness of Lynch and the Seahawks run game through two weeks of the regular season.


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