Tuesday cyber surfing: Training camp previews

Good morning, and here’s what’s “out there” about the Seahawks for today, July 24.

Mike Sando of ESPN.com reports defensive end Chris Clemons reached agreement Monday on a multi-year contract extension with the Seahawks. Clemons, 31, has led the Seahawks in sacks with 11 in each of the past two seasons – a total that is good for eighth in the NFL since 2010. An official announcement from the team is expected later today.

Sando also brings us his thoughts as Seahawks training camp approaches, including his take on Seahawks new DT Jason Jones, “Free-agent addition Jason Jones will fit much better at defensive tackle in Seattle than he did as a defensive end with Tennessee last season. The pass rush should improve as a result. Jones’ addition on a one-year contract holds promise because the Seahawks seem excited about him. The team’s leadership has been right on just about every defensive player Seattle has targeted by trade (Chris Clemons), the draft (see the secondary in particular), unrestricted free agency (Alan Branch), street free agency (Brandon Browner) and position changes (Red Bryant).”

Khaled Elsayed of ProFootballFocus.com gives us his take on NFC West training camp battles to watch, and it’s no surprise that the Seahawks camp is highlighted by the three-man quarterback competition between Tarvaris Jackson, Matt Flynn and Russell Wilson. But Elsayed also offers some interesting thoughts on the division as a whole, “Before 2011 this was viewed as the weakest division in the NFL, but after the San Francisco 49ers compiled the second best record in the NFC and came agonizingly close to the Super Bowl, people have had to reconsider that opinion. Especially when you consider the development of the Seattle Seahawks and the aggressive moves the St Louis Rams have made this offseason. Heck, you even have to imagine the Arizona Cardinals quarterback situation will have improved, so it’s looking like a division on the up.”

Hub Arkush and Dan Arkush of ProFootballWeekly.com continue their training camp opening report video series by taking a look at the Seattle Seahawks. The two discuss the free agent and rookie additions that head coach Pete Carroll and general manager John Schneider have put together this offseason, add their thoughts on the Seahawks three-man quarterback competition and wide receiver corps, and give their take on how the team’s strength – the defense – can improve in 2012.

Here at Seahawks.com Clare Farnsworth is back with his “Monday metatarsal musings,” as he re-hashes the Seahawks news from his time away on vacation, including remembering Grant Feasel, the former Seahawks center who passed away at age 52 on July 15, “He [Feasel] played on the franchise’s first division championship team in 1988, but also during that forgettable run from 1989-93 when the best the Seahawks could do was one winning record (9-7 in ’90),” writes Farnsworth. “But Feasel was a winner, on and off the field. A 16-game starter at center in 1989 and 1990, and 15-game starter in ’91, Feasel led with his chin and therefore lead by example. It was Steve Kelley at the Seattle Times, as I recall, who hung the moniker ‘Fightin’ Feasel’ on him, because whenever a tussle broke out during training camp Feasel almost always was involved.”

Farnsworth also wraps up his Seahawks 2012 positional preview with a look at the running backs. Farnsworth offers this outlook as the position group heads into 2012, “Despite all the handwringing over which of the three QBs will start this season, it’s [Marshawn] Lynch’s legs that will carry the Seahawks where they want to go – starting with posting the team’s first winning record since 2007, but not stopping until this team returns to the playoffs. It’s the running game that sets up the play-action passing game in coordinator Darrell Bevell’s offense. The Pro Bowl duo of Lynch and lead-blocking [Michael] Robinson will make sure this offense remains headed in that direction – the right direction. The addition of [Robert] Turbin is a plus, as is the versatility of [Leon] Washington.”