Tuesday cyber surfing: Breakout season for Okung

Good morning. Here’s what’s “out there” about the Seahawks for today, June 5:

John Clayton at ESPN.com has a photo blog of the Top 10 Breakout Players for the 2012 season, and Seahawks left tackle Russell Okung shares the No. 10 spot with Trent Williams of the Redskins: “Entering their third seasons, the top two left tackles from the 2010 draft should start to claim their Pro Bowl spots. Okung has to stay healthy and Williams needs to be more consistent.”

Also at ESPN.com, Mike Sando looks at the previous-coach or -coaches draft choices in the NFC West as one reason the 49ers have the edge over the other three teams: “The Mike Nolan era in San Francisco produced more heartache than the 49ers would care to revisit, but the long-term legacy isn’t so bad. Eleven draft choices, including eight current starters and five Pro Bowl selections, remain on the 49ers’ roster from the Nolan era. The other NFC West teams have a combined eight of their own draft choices from the same 2005-2008 window. That includes six starters and no Pro Bowl selections for the Seahawks, Cardinals and Rams.”

Sando also provides updated roided-out rosters for the teams in the division.

Eric Williams at the News Tribune addressed the Seahawks’ possible record during a Monday chat: “I think Seattle can win 10 games if the team stays relatively healthy. But I really think this team will go as the defense goes. As long as the offense plays mistake-free football and puts the ball in the end zone when they are inside the 20-yard line, the Seahawks can win a lot of games. But the defense and the swagger they play with will carry this team.”

Danny O’Neil at the Seattle Times looks at Justin Forsett’s stay with the Seahawks after he agreed to sign with the Texans in free agency: “Once Seattle decided it wanted a bigger, more physical running back to pair with (Marshawn) Lynch, Forsett no longer had a role. But Forsett doesn’t deserve to be characterized as if he were a hangnail who were got trimmed off, either. He’s much more than an afterthought, though, who will be remembered as the undersized overachiever that he was. He was a great teammate and a more productive player than anyone had a right to expect from a seventh-round pick. Remember all the time and money Seattle spent on free agents? Guys like Julius Jones, T.J. Duckett and Edgerrin James. Well, Forsett averaged more yards per carry than all of them.”

Bucky Brooks at NFL.com takes a look at the two-tight end sets that are sweeping the league, and will be featured more by the Seahawks after the recent acquisition of Kellen Winslow: “In the past, offensive coordinators would employ this tactic primarily in the red zone, but more play-callers are taking advantage of these matchups by aligning the tight end in a wide position to get him isolated on linebackers or defensive backs in space. The quarterback will capitalize on the matchup by targeting the tight end on fades (back-shoulder fades) and slants. Given the superior size advantage, this becomes a high-percentage throw that is nearly indefensible.”

Here at Seahawks.com, we examine the roots of “The Real Rob Report,” the behind-the-scenes look at the team that is provided by Pro Bowl fullback Michael Robinson: “This isn’t something that has just happened the past few months, or even years. Robinson has been planning for his long-term future since he was at Penn State. In December 2004, he earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in advertising/public relations – in only three years. Because the school did not have sports broadcasting program until his senior year, Robinson got a second degree in journalism a year later. Robinson’s first on-camera reporting gig was covering Penn State basketball games. From that acorn of an assignment, the tree that is ‘The Real Rob Report’ has blossomed. In 2006, his rookie season with the San Francisco 49ers, Robinson started doing ‘The Rookie Report.’ That morphed into ‘The Real Robinson Report,’ which became ‘The Real Rob Report’ last offseason.”


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