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Thursday cyber surfing: And still more on Irvin

Good morning. Here’s what’s “out there” about the Seahawks for today, May 3:

Just when you thought there was nothing left to say about Bruce Irvin, former Seahawks linebacker turned 710 ESPN analyst Dave Wyman says a lot: “His speed off the edge allows him to simply run past and around offensive tackles and tight ends. Irvin said Saturday that he feels he can run forward much faster than any lineman can “kick step” backwards. He did plenty of times at West Virginia, registering 22.5 sacks over the past two seasons. Most importantly, he has the ability to do something that I haven’t seen here in Seattle since my old teammate Rufus Porter used to do it. Irvin can turn a corner at full speed. He leans his body so his shoulders are about three feet off the ground and doesn’t slow down. This leads me to believe that he understands angles, he understands that he must fight for every last inch of space in order to “get home,” and he never slows down to do it.”

Here at Seahawks.com we check in with Michael Robinson, who is altering his approach to this offseason after his first season as a fulltime lead-blocking fullback that ended with him and Marshawn Lynch playing in the Pro Bowl: “Robinson’s mindset this offseason has been to prepare himself so that he can pick up in 2012 where he left off in 2011. That started with hitting the weights earlier than usual, monitoring his caloric intake and also adding to and increasing his regiment of recovery techniques. ‘I usually would take about a month off after the season, completely,’ he said. ‘This year, I took two weeks off. I adjusted my diet a little bit to make sure I was getting the calories in me every day so I can prepare to do the workouts. Now I’m to the point where I’m doing two workouts a day. Already.’ That comes with the position, and being one of the smaller players in the league to play the position. In his matchups with Pro Bowl tacklers last season, Robinson gave up 17 pounds to Willis, 22 to Fletcher, 27 to Lewis and 35 to Urlacher. But Lynch had three of his six 100-yard rushing performances in those games, and in the Week 16 game against San Francisco he broke the 49ers’ 36-game streak of not allowing a 100-yard rusher and also was the first to score a rushing TD against them last season. ‘I always have to fill the weight on me, or it will go away (during the season),’ said Robinson, who is up to 239 pounds. ‘That’s one of the things I really had to adjust to – lifting heavy, on a consistent basis. I’m stronger than I was at this time last year. Hopefully it will pay dividends for me in the fall.’ ”

Wednesday was a sad day in the NFL for anyone who ever played with, coached, played against or just watched Junior Seau, who was found dead in his Oceanside, Calif., home. Tributes and reports are everywhere, but one of the best comes from Jim Trotter at SI.com, who covered the Chargers during Seau’s Pro Bowl-filled run in San Diego: “You have to understand: Junior Seau didn’t live in San Diego. He was San Diego. Largely because he never forgot where he came from. He grew up hard in Oceanside, fighting for food and sometimes sleeping on mattresses in the garage. It’s one reason he focused on young people and struggling families when he established his foundation in the early 1990s. For instance, each Thanksgiving he would shut down the Mission Valley restaurant bearing his name and feed families affected by domestic violence and military personnel away from home. During Christmas, the foundation partners with a local store to allow underprivileged kids an opportunity to “purchase” gifts for family members. In total the Junior Seau Foundation, which also helps young people attend college, has distributed nearly $4 million since its inception. When Seau retired for the first time, we sat in the cool air outside his restaurant and reflected on his career. When I told him that his legacy off the field would ultimately dwarf what he did on it, he stared at me and said nothing. I walked away wondering if he truly understood how many lives he had touched with his generosity. He still seemed to measure his happiness (self worth?) by how people viewed him as a player. And now I wonder if that career didn’t contribute to his passing.”


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