Sizing up Russell Wilson

Wisconsin quarterback Russell Wilson (16) drops back to pass during the first half of the NCAA college football game against Illinois Saturday, Nov. 19, 2011 in Champaign, Ill. (AP Photo/Seth Perlman)

A closer look at third-round draft choice Russell Wilson:

Pick: 12th pick in the round, 75th overall; the only quarterbacks in franchise history that were drafted earlier were Rick Mirer in 1993 (second pick in the first round) and Dan McGwire in 1990 (16th pick in the first round).

Pertinent information: 5 feet 11, 206 pounds. … Played one season at Wisconsin, completing 225 of 309 passes for 3,175 yards and 33 touchdowns in leading the Badgers to the Rose Bowl. … Played at North Carolina State prior to that, passing for 3,563 yards and 28 TDs in 2010 and 3,027 yards and 31 TDs in 2009. … Was 30-20 in 50 career starts. … Left NC State because of his desire to continuing playing baseball. … Also selected in the MLB draft by the Colorado Rockies and played two seasons of minor league ball, including a stint in Pasco. … His father, the late Harrison Wilson III, played football and baseball at Dartmouth and was on the San Diego Chargers’ preseason squad. … His older brother, Harrison IV, played football and baseball at Richmond. … Born Nov. 29, 1988.

What he brings: Experience in the West Coast offense from his days at NC State, as well as the play-action game from his season at Wisconsin. Not to mention off-the-charts athletic ability and confidence.

Where he fits: A fourth QB, with a lot of potential, in a group that already includes incumbent starter Tarvaris Jackson, who was signed in free agency last year; Matt Flynn, who was signed in free agency this year; and Josh Portis, who was signed as a rookie free agent last year. Who fits where? “We’ll figure that out in time,” coach Pete Carroll said.

What they’re saying: “His feet and his natural ability to find passing lanes. He’s live in the pocket. He’s got long arms. He’s got big hands. He’s extremely talented and he gains the trust of everyone around him. He can tilt a room.” – general manager John Schneider, on how Wilson compensates for his lack of prototypical height

What he’s saying: “I’ve played in two pro-style offenses. At NC State I was in the shotgun – West Coast style of offense, which is what the Seahawks run for the most part in terms of terminology. Then being at Wisconsin, I think that really helped me because I was under center more and the play-action game I think is something I definitely excel at. I think that’s one of the strengths of my games and something I always work on. But it all depends on what you have around you. You’ve got to have great players around you and that’s what I’m fired up about because I know the Seahawks have so many threats.”


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