Friday cyber surfing: Schneider talks draft

Good morning. Here’s what’s “out there” about the Seahawk for today, April 20:

GM John Schneider held a pre-draft Q&A session with reporters on Thursday, which led to the surf being “up” today.

Eric Williams at the News Tribune looks at the Seahawks’ interest in Texas A&M QB Ryan Tannehill, which likely will be just that – only interest, and from a afar: “ ‘He’s a really good player and he’s got a great upside,’ Schneider said about Tannehill. ‘We would definitely consider him (at No. 12). Just because we’ve done these things, the guys know – it’s no disrespect to Tarvaris, or Matt or Josh at all. The guys know at some point we wanted to get this thing rolling where we would be able to get a younger quarterback in, and kind of getting them going, whether it’s in the first round or second round or however it comes.’ But Schneider isn’t expecting Tannehill to last that long. ‘It’s fun to talk about, but I mean, he’s not going to be there,’ Schneider said. ‘You know, I think he’s going to get drafted pretty high.’ ”

Mike Mayock of the NFL Network did a conference call on Thursday, and the network’s draft analyst said Tannehill should not be selected in the Top 10 but likely will because of the premium on the position: “ ‘Based just on film of his 19 starts, Tannehill ‘shouldn’t be a top-10 pick. … But in today’s NFL, there’s a good chance he will be,’ Mayock said. Mayock mentioned that Tannehill’s film alone might not even be worth a top-15 or top-20 pick. He’s ‘at least a year away.’ Mayock doesn’t believe the Browns will go after Tannehill at No. 4, instead targeting Brandon Weeden later in the draft. But it would be very surprising if Tannehill slipped past the Dolphins at No. 8. Dolphins general manager Jeff Ireland said Thursday he won’t be ‘pressured’ to take Tannehill.”

Danny O’Neil at the Seattle Times provides an injury update from Schneider’s session: “Seahawks GM John Schneider doesn’t expect James Carpenter to be ready to begin practicing when training camp opens, but he said receiver Sidney Rice will be the healthiest he’s ever been since entering the NFL. Those were the two most pertinent notes in the litany of health updates Schneider provided.”

Mike Sando at ESPN.com looks at the prospect of the teams in the NFC West trading down in the first round of the draft next Thursday, including the Seahawks: “In every case, making an effort to trade down requires a team to trust its ability to find quality players later in a draft – often in the middle rounds. This is the range where the Seahawks’ Pete Carroll and John Schneider have fared well since taking over the team before the 2010 draft. The team has used seven fourth- and fifth-round choices during that time, most in the division. Those picks have produced a Pro Bowl safety (Kam Chancellor), a very good starting cornerback (Richard Sherman), a starting linebacker (K.J. Wright) and two players coming off injuries (Kris Durham, Walter Thurmond).”

Here at Seahawks.com, we have Schneider’s thoughts on trading down from the 12th spot: “ ‘Now we’re in a position – especially at 12 – I look at 12 like at 11, 12, 13 there’s a little bit of a ledge there – there’s a little bit of different players,” Schneider said. “So if we want to stay and pick, I think it’s a really cool place to pick. If somebody does something that’s really attractive, then we feel comfortable with the way we’ve prepared that we can go back, too. We feel like we’ve covered some things so we can go ahead and just take the good players that come to us.” Who that player at 12 might be is the million-dollar question, and won’t be determined until those teams sitting at 4-11 make their selections. Quarterbacks Andrew Luck and Robert Griffin III are all but locks to go 1-2 to the Indianapolis Colts and Washington Redskins. But at No. 3, the Minnesota Vikings are reportedly deciding between tackle Matt Kalil, wide receiver Justin Blackmon and cornerback Morris Claiborne. So things already are in a wait-and-see mode for the Cleveland Browns at No. 4.”

We also continue our draft series with a look at the offensive lineman, specifically USC tackle Matt Kalil: “Saying that Matt Kalil was born to play in the NFL might be a stretch, but not by much. His brother, Ryan, is a three-time Pro Bowl center for the Carolina Panthers and was a member of the 2003 and 2004 national championship teams at the University of Southern California. His father, Frank, also played center and was drafted by the Buffalo Bills in 1982 before playing for the USFL’s Arizona Wranglers and Houston Gamblers. Now comes Matt, a 6-foot-6, 306-pound chip off the same block who also played at USC and is the top-rated linemen in this year’s draft class – and is even being called the most-gifted lineman produced by the Trojans since Tony Boselli. ‘He’s everything that he’s billed to be,’ Seahawks coach Pete Carroll said, which is saying a lot. ‘He’s big-time. He’s physically equipped. He’s got a toughness about him, which he had as a freshman in high school.’ Carroll would know, because he recruited Kalil to USC and then coached him there before joining the Seahawks in 2010.”

We’ve also got a closer look at the linemen and a Q&A with Stanford guard David DeCastro.

Mike Silver at YahooSports.com has his ultimate mock draft, where teams select players in the league rather than players coming into the league. And with the 12th pick in the first round, the Seattle Seahawks select …: “Patrick Willis. The Seahawks, who once had a menacing force in the middle in Lofa Tatupu, pilfer the league’s best middle linebacker from an NFC West rival. Scot McCloughan, the Seattle front-office executive who drafted Willis as the 49ers’ general manager, proclaims his team will “beat the hell out of” San Francisco for the foreseeable future.”

Jay Glazer, a reporter for Fox Sports, was on 710 ESPN and discussed the working relationship between Schneider and Carroll: “ ‘It’s so often where people, on the surface, in this league look like they’re playing nice and working together and they’re just not,’ Glazer said. ‘When you talk to these guys ‘off the record’ and you’re around it, you really get a sense (that) these guys (coaches and general managers) are just waiting for the other one to slip up or this one’s just constantly talking to the owner, just getting prepared for the other one to slip up. That’s certainly not the case with these two guys.’ Glazer said that accord is evident in the way Carroll and Schneider agree on personnel decisions. ‘They work phenomenal together,’ he said.