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Wednesday in Hawkville

A recap of the day’s activities:

FOCUS ON

Damion McIntosh. The first five weeks of this NFL season have been different from any in the past 10 years for the veteran offensive lineman, because he wasn’t playing football after being released by the Kansas City Chiefs last month on their final roster cut.

That changed today, when McIntosh practiced with the Seahawks for the first time after being signed Tuesday when tackle Brandon Frye was placed on injured reserve with a neck injury sustained in Sunday’s game against Jacksonville Jaguars.

So, what has McIntosh been doing?

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“Working out,” the 6-foot-4, 320-pound McIntosh said. “That’s all I can do. I don’t want to call them and bug them too much.”

The Seahawks had called McIntosh since he was released, just to check on him. Monday, he got the call he’d been waiting for when the Seahawks learned the injury to Frye was more serious than it appeared on Sunday.

McIntosh spent most of his first practice with the Seahawks working at left tackle on the No. 2 line. But it was a needed first step in getting him ready to contribute, if needed, in this week’s big game against the Arizona Cardinals at Qwest Field.

Kyle Williams is expected to start at left tackle, but the best-laid contingency plans can change in a hurry. That was the case last week, when Williams went from the practice squad, to the active roster, to the starting lineup – all in less than 24 hours after Frye went down on the eighth offensive play against the Jags.

The Jamaican-born, Florida-raised McIntosh is familiar with the Seahawks’ zone-blocking scheme because he played in similar schemes with the San Diego Chargers (2000-2003), Miami Dolphins (2004-06) and Chiefs (2007-08). He’s also familiar with some of the terminology, because Seahawks line coach Mike Solari was the Chiefs’ line coach in 2007.

McIntosh has started 111 of 115 games – 93 at left tackle, 16 at right tackle and two at right guard.

How did it feel finally getting back on the practice field?

“We’ll see when the bruises come up,” he cracked, looking down at his massive arms.

THINKING OF LUCAS

Cornerback Ken Lucas is in Mississippi and will be there until his father’s funeral on Friday. Clyde Lucas died on Friday.

“There are more important things in life than a football game,” coach Jim Mora said. “It’s sacrilegious when a head coach says that. I realize that, but it’s true. … Kenny needs some time to grieve and be with his family.”

Lucas played in Sunday’s game against the Jaguars and made six tackles. He will return in time to play this week against the Cardinals.

“Just to have him go out and play the way he did shows what kind of guy and player he is,” fellow cornerback Kelly Jennings said. “It shows he’s really special and dedicated to this football team.”

INJURY REPORT

The official report, as released by the team:

OUT

LB Leroy Hill (groin)
OT Walter Jones (knee)
OT Sean Locklear (ankle)
OG Rob Sims (ankle)
S C.J. Wallace (hamstring)

LIMITED IN PRACTICE

WR Nate Burleson (back)
CB Travis Fisher (pelvis)
DE Patrick Kerney (groin)

FULL PARTICIPATION

QB Matt Hasselbeck (rib)
DE Lawrence Jackson (rib)
DE Cory Redding (shoulder)
OG Mansfield Wrotto (ankle)

FB Justin Griffith is back after missing three games with a sprained knee and will start against the Cardinals.

For the Cardinals, TE Stephen Spach (ankle) did not practice and four players were limited – WR Steve Breaston (knee), CB Bryant McFadden (ankle), DE Kenny Iwebema (ankle) and RB Jason Wright (back).

CAN YOU HEAR US NOW?

Tra Thomas, who started at left tackle for the Jaguars on Sunday during their 41-0 loss to the Seahawks at Qwest Field, offered this explanation for the team’s offensive struggles:

“They did a good job of executing and capitalizing on our mistakes. They kept their home crowd into it. It was just a hostile environment that we couldn’t adjust to.”

YOU DON’T SAY

“We came back feeling like we missed an opportunity when we lost the Super Bowl in St. Louis (2001 season). We pushed too hard to be perfect. And when you do that, you don’t play very well. I think that’s the same thing we’re dealing with, trying so hard to live up to expectations.” – Cardinals QB Kurt Warner, who played for the Rams from 1998-2003


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